About Hudson Heights

Neighborhood denizens.

Walk down any street and the mix of languages you hear testifies to the array of nationalities. Look around you and you will see from the building styles that most of the neighborhood was built at the end of the turn of the last century. The architectural details of Hudson Heights apartment buildings hint at the era. Gargoyles, turrets and Gothic-style facades are whimsical reminders of the past, with Art Deco and neo-Classical designs representing styles popular at the time.

 

     Last spring, The New York Times profiled a neighborhood resident whose enthusiasm for living here centers on friends, family—and a larger apartment than he could find elsewhere in town. In 2014, The Times noted the growth in outstanding restaurants in Hudson Heights, as well as in Inwood and Lower WaHi. Two of them are recommended by editors of the Michelin Guide. It also published a description of affordable apartments in the neighborhood, and included a batch of photo streetscapes that highlight the area.

 

     Three years earlier, The Wall Street Journal noted the neighborhood’s variety of restaurants and The Times wrote up our main street, West 181st, and the uphill climbs bicyclists have on our hills. The people who live here come to love living here.

Children play and seniors gather in Bennett Park, where Gen. Washington had his fort, on Manhattan’s highest spot.
The city goes downhill from here.

     As with most New York neighborhoods, the boundaries are inexact. Broadly speaking, Hudson Heights is bounded on the south by the George Washington Bridge and to the north by Fort Tryon Park; to the east by Broadway and by the Hudson River to the west. Along with Fort George and Sherman Creek, it’s one of several smaller neighborhoods within Washington Heights, Manhattan’s biggest neighborhood in area and population. More than 198,400 people live here, according to the 2010 Census, which also showed the population of Hudson Heights had grown by 13 percent since 2000.

 

     Wondering what to do here? The Times created this top-ten list of Upper Manhattan sites. Wondering what the vibe is like? Time Out New York ranked Washington Heights No. 3 in its list of neighborhoods with New York soul. The Times also composed this slide show of the architecture and people. In 2011, DNA Info, a digital news organization, ranked Washington Heights as the fourth-safest neighborhood in Manhattan, outranking the West Village, Murray Hill, and Turtle Bay.

A 1909 view of The Pinehurst, left, Chiselhurst, center right, and our northernmost neighbor, right, on Fort Washington Avenue. It was published in The Times, which referred to the area as the Fort Washington District.

From Lang Berge to Hudson Heights

The area was called Lang Berge (Long Hill) by Dutch settlers until the 18th century, when it become home to Fort Washington and Fort Tryon during the Revolutionary War. As early as 1909 The Times labeled the area the Fort Washington District, and in the years following World War I it was referred to alternatively as Fort Washington and Fort Tryon, both of which had become names of parks. “Fort Tryon” lives on in the Not For Tourists Guide to New York City, the Tryon Towers apartments on Pinehurst Avenue, and at the Fort Tryon Jewish Center.

 

    Starting in the late 1930s, the area was called Frankfurt-on-the-Hudson because of the tight com- munity of German Jews who settled here, including a disproportionate number from Frankfurt-am-Main. Given New Yorkers’ penchant for making clever abbreviations from their neighborhoods’ names, we’re lucky no one thought to shorten the German reference to FrOTH.

Fort Washington Collegiate Church at Advent.

     Not that name changes have stopped. In the last couple of decades immigrants from the Caribbean moved in; they referred to Washington Heights as El Alto. Newer immi- grants call it Quisqueya Heights.

 

     In late 1992, residents started meeting to create a group dedicated to improving the neighborhood. They discussed several names for the area before settling on the one that you know today, and in 1993 Hudson Heights Owners’ Coalition was formed. It may have been suggested by a line written in 1992 by James Bennet, who published it in an essay in The New York Times: “... a community ... where breezes from the Hudson blow across the rocky heights that helped give the area its name.”

 

     Today Hudson Heights is home to a growing number of artists, professionals and families, and retains its strong flavors from the Dominican Republic and the nations of the Russian Federation. Among the newcomers lured by affordable prices and open space are Jewish families, whose presence here more than doubled between 2002 and 2011, according to a study, and Mexicans, whose population also recently doubled, though over a longer period, 2000 to 2013.

 

    Immigrants have long been important to Upper Manhattan. Hudson Heights is where you’ll find the shrine to America’s first saint, Frances Xavier Cabrini, the patron saint of immigrants. In the church sanctuary, a monumental mosaic was restored in 2015 so that its tiles of  marble Venetian glass and gold-leaf crystal sparkle as they did when installed in 1959.

Contact Us Today

Board of Directors

447 Ft. Washington Owners’ Corp.
447 Ft. Washington Ave, Apt. 68
New York, NY 10033
(212) 896-8600
board@thepinehurst.org

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