Events in the Neighborhood, Sept. 16–22

Hudson Heights, Inwood and Lower WaHi

A collection of events and activities in the neighborhoods of Washington Heights, from Audubon Park to Inwood, including Lower WaHi, Fort George, Hudson Heights, and Sherman Creek.

 

     Find out the reasons medieval Europeans grew the herbs, varietals and fruit-bearing flora that are nurtured today at the Cloisters today. Tours include horticultural, architectural, and historical insights.

     Free with museum admission. Afternoons daily at 1 and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park. Through the end of the month.

 

 

    Mark Hispanic Heritage Month at a celebration hosted by the Manhattan comptroller, Scott Stringer.

     Free. Monday evening at 6 at the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum on St. Nicholas Avenue.

 

 

 

     The Lions (0-1-2) welcome the No. 19 Red Storm of St. John’s (5-0) for a night of men’s soccer.

     Monday night at 7 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday

     To celebrate the participation of the Hispanic Society of American in the exhibition “Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light” at the National Gallery in London and at the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin, the Society is reopening the Joaquín Sorolla Vision of Spain Gallery for a limited time.

     The gallery houses the monumental series of 14 paintings known as Vision of Spain by the Valencian master Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, the preeminent artist in Spain at the turn of the 20th century.

     Nearly 12 feet tall and 200 feet in combined length, the canvases that comprise Vision of Spain were painted by Sorolla at various locations in Spain between 1912 and 1919.

     Closed until 2020 for extensive renovations, these tours will be offered if you book a visit in advance at visitsorolla@hispanicsociety.org.

      Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:30 to 4:30, by appointment only, at the Society’s museum on Audubon Terrace.

 

 

     Join Words Without Borders and the American Academy of Poets for a celebration of the 2019 Poems in Translation Contest winners, with readings by Mónica de la Torre, Jacob Rogers and others.

     Having received 717 poems from 282 poets from 87 countries translated from 55 languages, the groups selected four winning poems, which will be published in Poem-A-Day and in Words Without Borders every Saturday this month.
     Free. Tuesday night at 7 at the Word Up Community Bookshop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street.
 
 

Wednesday

     Renato Rosaldo’s new prose poetry collection shares his experiences and those of his group of twelve Mexican American Tucson High School friends known as the Chasers as they grew up, graduated, and fell out of touch.

     Derived from interviews with the Chasers and three other friends conducted after their fiftieth high school reunion, Rosaldo’s poems present a chorus of distinct voices and perspectives that convey the realities of Chicano life on the borderlands from the 1950s to the present.

     Rosaldo will read from The Chasers for the neighborhood.

     Free. Wednesday evening at 6:30 at the Word Up Community Bookshop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street.

 

 

Thursday

     Estonian composer Arvo Pärt once made this observation: “The instant and eternity are struggling within us … this is the cause of all our contradictions.” Let time stop—at least for an hour or so—and remember that life is lived somewhere in between the single moments, and the spreading infinity that surrounds them.

     Joshua Roman on cello performs Pärt’s Fratres, the Sonata for Cello and Piano by Schnitke, and
Pärt’s Spiegel im Spiegel.

     $80. Wednesday night at 8 with a wine tasting at 7 in the Crypt under the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

Friday

  

     Join in an evening of dance, fitness and fun.

     Enjoy Latin dancing music, along with an open house and special tours of J. Hood Wright Recreation Center, all while you get fit. 

     Free. Friday afternoon from 4:30 to 6 at the rec center in J. Hood Wright Park in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 174th Street.

 

 

 

     It’s a busy weekend for the Columbia women’s soccer team (3-2-1), with two matches in three days.

     First up, the New Jersey Institute of Technology Highlanders take on the Lions.

     Friday evening at 6 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

     Silvestre Dangond comes from Colombia to perform his concert for fans Uptown.

      Friday night at 9 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

Saturday

 

     Hudson River Community Sailing is offering sailing lessons for individuals and families. Complete the weekend course to earn the U.S. Sailing Certification.

     $75. Saturdays and Sundays at 10:30, 1:30, and 4:30 at the Dyckman Marina in Inwood. Weekends through October 13.

 

 

 

     Do you remember what Uptown was like in 1984? If not, recall that the city was coming out of bankruptcy, drugs were a scourge, and danger, it seemed, lurked around every corner.

     A group of neighbors saw the area for its potential, and opened of of the very few private gardens in Manhattan. You can get a key to the gate by joining, but it’s also open for the public’s enjoyment on weekends.

     Now the Riverside-Inwood Neighborhood Garden is celebrating its thirty-fifth anniversary, and you’re invited.

     Saturday from noon to 5 at the garden in Inwood at the confluence of Riverside Drive, Broadway, and Dyckamn Street.

 

 

     In Passages/Pasajes, a site-specific sonic performance will focus on Uptown neighborhoods, whose residents will enact ritualized activities created from their collective histories.

     Free. Saturday afternoon from 4 to 6 on the Dongan Lawn in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

    

     Try special beer cocktails, Pilsner, and summer Ale from Dyckman Beer Company at an end-of-summer beer tasting.

     You can also sample an array of food from Inwood Bar and Grill, and dance the evening away with Annette A Aguilar & StringBeans Latin Jazz.

     $15. Saturday afternoon from 4 to 6 at the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.

 

 

 

 

     The Christian band Grupo Barak performs from its new album at its WaHi tour date.

     Saturday night at 7:30 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday

     A yellow-throated warbler, a fish crow and boat-tailed grackle await your gaze on this two-hour tour of bird mural in John James Audubon’s old neighborhood, where he kept a country estate from 1842 to 1851..  

     Your guide will lead you to secret locations where contemporary artists interpreted and painted Audubon’s endangered birds throughout Northern Manhattan, above a subway station, wrapped around a bodega’s ice cooler and covering the walls of walkups and early twentieth-century apartment buildings. The tour lasts about two hours, so take some water.

     $30. Sunday morning at 10 at the Church of the Intercession across from Audubon Terrace on Broadway at 155th Street. Also on October 6, 27, and November 3 and 17.

 

 

     The city is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife and is a popular spot for migrating birds. The Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best birding spots in the urban jungle.

     The program is appropriate for all skill levels and beginners are welcome.

     To enhance your experience take binoculars and a field guide, or ask a Ranger if she’ll share. A bottle of water is a good idea too.

      Free. Sunday morning at 10 at the corner of Seaman Avenue and Isham Street.

 

 

 

     Drexel is the latest team to take the “A” Train to play Columbia’s women’s soccer team.

     Sunday afternoon at 2 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

     The power of art to make an emotional connection is on display every Sunday afternoon in Apartment 3F—that’s Marjorie Eliot’s place, where she invites veteran musicians to play along. 

     Famous and up-and-coming artists perform at Eliot’s weekly sessions and her free concerts are legendary among jazz aficionados.

     Free. Sunday afternoons at 4 at 555 Edgecombe Avenue, Apt. 3F, in Lower WaHi.

 

 

Continuing in the neighborhood

     Each month Uptown writers get together to workshop some prose based on the theme for the gathering.

     Join neighborhood authors who reflect on the theme’s meaning. Each writer will have five minutes to read to you.

     $5. Usually on the third Monday night, typically at 8, at Le Cheile in Hudson Heights just off Lafayette Plaza on 181st Street and Pinehurst Avenue.

 

 

 

     The High Bridge—New York City’s oldest standing bridge—is a landmark that connects walkers and cyclists with Manhattan and the Bronx.
     The High Bridge is a path from the neighborhoods of Washington Heights to Highbridge across the river, and is accessible from both boroughs.
     Free. Daily from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Enter from Highbridge Park, in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue in the 170s.

 

 

     A New York farmers’ market is open Thursdays on 175th Street between Wadsworth Avenue and  Broadway.

 

    The Inwood greenmarket is a year-round neighborhood favorite.
    People of all ages, backgrounds, and tastes gather each Saturday to meet and greet their friends and neighbors and do their weekly shopping. Even on the coldest, darkest winter Saturdays, loyal Inwood shoppers come out because they know they can’t get products like this anywhere else.
     A core group of 15 farmers attends every week of the year, and during the peak of the season, five more join to round out the offerings with the summer’s bounty.
     Saturdays from 8 to 3 on
Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

     From late spring through the late autumn, a greenmarket in Lower WaHi offers Mexican herbs, peppers, and greens, honey, cheese, juice pressed from ripe orchard fruit, produce grown in the rich soil of Orange County’s “Black Dirt” region, pastries and fresh bread. You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     Saturdays in the spring and summer on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street. On hiatus until spring.

 

 

     In 1890, the third Polo Grounds rose within the gaze of Jumel Terrace and would serve as home to the New York Giants baseball team from 1891 to 1957, the New York Highlanders (who would become the Yankees) in 1913–22, the New York Giants in 1925–55.

     The exact spot of home place, seen at right in 1906, is now marked by a bronze plaque in a courtyard of the Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital. A lot has change since then, and history buffs and baseball fans will find the nuances and transformations in a new show.

     The exhibition explores the teams that made the stadium a New York icon and the associated personalities that became local and national heroes.

     Free. At the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park. Open through January 5.

 

 

     Clean out your closets and recycle at the same time.
     Take clean and dry textiles like clothing, paired shoes, towels, sheets, scarves, hats, bags and belts for reuse or recycling. Sponsored by
Grow NYC.
     Free. Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Inwood Greenmarket (in Inwood Hill Park) on Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

 

    Slavery is a chilling chapter in the nation’s history, and it happened here in Uptown too.

     The artist Peter Hoffmeister explored the subject through investigations with curators, researchers and historians while spending a year as an artist in residence at a Manhattan farmhouse.

     His exhibition explores the themes and results of slavery in Upper Manhattan. Through March 31.

 

 

Planning ahead

    

     Is it the Expressway Classic? Long Island University’s men’s soccer team does the reverse commute to play Columbia this week.

     Monday night, September 23, at 7 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

     Hear from the architectural historian and critic Paul Goldberger as he discusses the history of baseball through the stories of vibrant and ever-changing ballparks.

     An investigation of New York City’s great stadiums will illuminate the city’s love affair with America’s favorite pastime. The program is held in conjunction with the exhibition Home Plate: A Celebration of the Polo Grounds. A book signing will follow the discussion.

     $20; members, $15. Wednesday night, September 25, at 7 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Lower WaHi in Roger Morris Park.

 

 

     Support Uptown arts at an elegant evening on the red carpet in celebration and support of Inwood Art Works’ film, stage, music, and visual art programming.

     Mingle with the who’s who of Uptown and beyond, sample hors d’oeuvres and drinks, and take in music from local classical singers while dancing to Inwood’s finest salsa and Latin jazz on a roof deck with views across the Hudson, the Harlem and beyond.

     $50 to $85. Wednesday night, September 25, at 7:30 at Republica in Inwood at the intersection of Sherman Avenue and Dyckman Street.

 

 

     In medieval France, the Alsatian town of Colmar, left—now considered the capital of Alsatian wine—had a flourishing Jewish community that played a leading role in the region's wine business.

     The group was decimated by the Black Plague, but a cache of valuable decorative objects from that time discovered hidden in the wall of a confectioner's shop has shed light on the opulent culture of Colmar's Jews.

     Celebrated chef and author Yotam Ottolenghi explores the deep Jewish roots of Colmar through the region's wine and cuisine in a magical evening of conversation, food, and wine.

     Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy. Tickets include same-day Museum admission.

     Sold out. Thursday and Friday nights, September 26 and 27, at 7 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

     The Lions conclude their non-conference home matches when the men take on the Monmouth Hawks.

     Friday night, September 27, at 7 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Come take part in a real ghost hunt and learn the basics of ghost hunting with resident paranormal investigators Vincent Carbone and Christopher Davalos while possibly communicating with some of Uptown’s former residents.
     The evening begins with a discussion of paranormal theory and the history of Manhattan's oldest house. Visitors will learn how to use electronic paranormal detective equipment and then move into a full investigation.

     Participants must be at least 18 years old. Refreshments are included.

     $35 to $40. Saturday night at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Jumel Terrace. Also on September 28, October 12 and 26, November 16 and 23, and December 6.    

 

     Learn how the original illustrated books came to be so fantastically decorated.

     The calligrapher and manuscript illuminator Karen Gorst leads a demonstration and workshop on medieval manuscript illumination. The demonstration and a hands-on activity will repeat throughout the session. No reservations are necessary.

      Free with museum admission. Saturday, September 28, from noon to 2 in the Saint-Guilhem Cloister gallery of the Cloisters Museum in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     Columbia opens its football season at home with one game already in the books.

     This week the Lions host the Georgetown Hoyas in one of only two non-conference games Uptown this season.

     Saturday afternoon, September 28, at 1 on Wien Field at the Baker Athletic Conference in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

     Come take part in a real ghost hunt and learn the basics of ghost hunting with resident paranormal investigators Vincent Carbone and Christopher Davalos while possibly communicating with some of Uptown’s former residents.
     The evening begins with a discussion of paranormal theory and the history of Manhattan's oldest house. Visitors will learn how to use electronic paranormal detective equipment and then move into a full investigation.

     Participants must be at least 18 years old. Refreshments are included.

     $35 to $40. Saturday night, September 28, at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Jumel Terrace. Also on October 12 and 26, November 16 and 23, and December 6.    

   

 

     Deepak Chopra, the author, public speaker, and alternative medicine advocate, is a prominent figure in the New Age movement. He will sign books at an event whose details arer still under wraps.

     Wednesday, October 2, at a time to be announced later at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

     People en Español Festival regresa a Nueva York. Únete a tus celebridades y artistas favoritos durante dos días inolvidables de música, danza, paneles, autógrafos, actividades para toda la familia y mucho más.

     Aunque no se necesitan boletos para asistir, puedes reservar con antelación y así garantizar tu entrada, ¡pues la capacidad es limitada!

     Gratis. 5 y 6 de Octubre de 9:30 a.m. a 5:30 p.m. los dos dias en el Armory Track de Baja WaHi en Fort Washington Avenue y Calle 168.

 

 

     Find just the tchotchke or gewgaw you’ve been looking for — or sign up for a booth to sell your collection at the semi-annual flea market in the Riverside-Inwood Neighborhood Garden.

     All day on Saturday, October 5, at the garden in Inwood at the confluence of Riverside Drive, Broadway, and Dyckman Street.

 

 

 

 

     Soccer has its first Ivy League matchup Uptown this year when the Columbia men host Brown.

     Saturday afternoon, October 5, at 1 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

     The Apollo Circle is invited to celebrate autumn with the Department of Medieval Art and The Met Cloisters Museum and Gardens.

     Learn about beer making in the middle ages in the Bonnefont Garden, listen to short talks in the galleries, and enjoy a crisp brew.

     To join the Apollo Circle, send an email to the group at Apollo.Circle@metmuseum.org

     Saturday evening, October 5, at 5 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

    Are you a Lion?

    Mark Alumnae Day with the women’s soccer team.

    The current Lions play host to Ivy League rival Brown at the autumn conference opener.

     Saturday evening, October 5, at 7 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     After a second smashing year, Sukkahwood is pleased once again to invite artists and designers to re-imagine a Sukkah and to be part of the Sukkahwood outdoor exhibition of temporary dwelling installations.

     The exhibit's values of inclusion are universal and seek to bring together people from all walks of life. Sukkahwood is about re-thinking an essential Jewish tradition through unique and out-of-the-box thinking, using materials with a focus on sustainability and affordability, and connecting with the outdoors.

     Sunday, October 6, at noon in Inwood Hill Park.

 

 

     A cache of jeweled rings, brooches, and coins—the precious possessions of a Jewish family of medieval Alsace—was hidden in the fourteenth century in the wall of a house in Colmar, France.

     Discovered in 1863 and on view at The Met Cloisters, the Colmar Treasure revives the memory of a once-thriving Jewish community that was scapegoated and put to death when the Plague struck the region with devastating ferocity in 1348–49.

     A generous loan of the Musée de Cluny, Paris, the Colmar Treasure is on display alongside select works from The Met Cloisters and little-known Judaica from collections in the United States and France.

     Jennifer Ball, associate professor of art history at Brooklyn College, will explain the idea of fashioning luxury on a guided tour of the exhibit. Presented with the exhibition The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy.

     Free with museum admission. Sunday, October 6, at noon at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park. Monthly on the first Sunday. The exhibit runs through January 12.

 

 

     When a planned collaboration for the city’s biggest Broadway opening is sidelined by romance, dance carries the lovers away.

      High Strung Free Dance opens October 11, but this special advance screening features the star, Julia Doherty, in a live performance with others in the cast and Complexions Contemporary Ballet.

     Monday night, October 7, at 7:30 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     You don’t have to be a Lion to enjoy college football, especially on Northern Manhattan Neighbors Appreciation Day.

     Wear blue and you can’t go wrong as you enjoy the festivities and special promotions when Columbia hosts the Blue Devils of Central Connecticut State.

     Saturday afternoon, October 12, at 1 at Wien Stadium at the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

    

 

     The Lions are looking for another victory when they host the Quakers of Penn.

     Saturday evening, October 12, at 5 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

     You’ve heard about it but you can’t quite imagine how this architectural confection came to be in WaHi.

     So here’s your chance to explore this stunning 3,400-seat theater, its mezzanine, grand foyer, balcony, exterior and if you’re lucky, you’ll get to go up on stage.
     Reservation is required
here.

     The history of United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth-largest theater and now a landmarked building, began in 1930, when it was then one of five Loew’s “Wonder Theatres” across the boroughs and New Jersey. Designed by noted architect Thomas Lamb (Cort Theatre, the former Ziegfeld Theatre) with interiors overseen by decorative specialist Harold Rambusch (Waldorf Astoria, Radio City Music Hall), it was one of the region’s premier vaudeville and movie houses.

     Free. Sunday morning, October 13, at 10 at the theater in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street. On the second Sunday of the month.

 

 

 

     The Quakers come to New York for a men’s soccer match against Columbia’s Lions.

     Sunday afternoon, October 13, at 1 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

    The Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra’s presents Robert Schumann’s 2nd Symphony, Angélica Negron’s “What Keeps Me Awake,” and a new violin concerto by Chris Whittaker.

     Followed by a post-concert reception for friends of the orchestra.

     $5 ($7 at the door); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, October 18, at 7 at the George Washington Educational Campus in Fort George at 549 Audubon Avenue, and Saturday afternoon, October 19, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Here’s your chance to see inside of the Fort Tryon Park Cottage.

      The 1908 structure flanking the Heather Garden was originally the gatehouse of the C. K. G Billings Estate and has retained its charm over its many uses in the last 110 years.

     There is limited space and the 30-minute tours will be first-come, first-served. The last tour begins at 3:30.

     Free. Saturday and Sunday, October 19 and 20, from noon to 4 in the Heather Garden in Hudson Heights at Margaret Corbin Circle.

 

 

     Heinavanker is a stunning Estonian a cappella ensemble that performs timeless compositions ranging from runic songs and folk hymns to the contemporary classics of Arvo Pärt.

     Presented in the magical Fuentidueña Chapel, these unusual voices create a sonic environment that is both ethereal and deeply human.

     $65; children $1 (<— not a typo). Saturday afternoon, October 19, at 1 and 3 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

     Columbia opens conference play at home as the Lions host the Quakers of Penn.

     Saturday afternoon, October 19, at 1:30 at Wien Stadium in the Baker Athletic Conference in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Bachete artist Raulín Rodríguez brings his Dominican stylings to Upper Manhattan to celebrate his thirtieth anniversary.

     Saturday night, October 19, at 8 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

     Suffering, remorse, and guilt are pervasive in Carlo Gesualdo's life and work.

     This complex man's music is so full of shocking dissonances that it has taken nearly 400 years to really comprehend his singular musical language.

     Les Arts Florissants, the unrivalled Renaissance and baroque period ensemble, will be making its Uptown debut with this all-vocal program.

     $85; children really can attend for $1. Sunday afternoon, October 20, and 1 and 3:30 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

    

 

     The reading series Bloom presents a variety of authors and genres.

     Bloom’s literary readings and discussions will get you to shake off your assumptions and think hard about everything. The evening includes wine and light fare. Pleasant as a tea party, but with booze and cutting-edge writing. More information at www.bloomreadings.org.

    $7 suggested donation includes wine and hors d’oeuvres. Sunday evening, October 20, at 5 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens, in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street. Monthly on the third Sunday, September through May.

 

 

     If The New York Times calls you “the nation’s most important quartet,” then you must be doing something right.

     In the case of the JACK Quartet, they’ve established themselves as one of the leaders in new music, giving voice to countless composers, while creating a new body of works that prove classical music has a future far beyond powdered wigs and dusty scores.

     For their Crypt Sessions debut, the JACK will give the New York premiere of Lines Made by Walking, a piece by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer John Luther Adams that channels nature in all of its magnificence and fragility.

     $80. Monday night. October 21, at 8 with a wine tasting at 7 in the Crypt under the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

    

 

     El Caballo Johnny Ventura, the Dominican singer and band leader of merengue and salsa, shares his extensive musical catalog with fans Uptown.

     He also served as mayor of Santo Domingo. If only he were eligible for a job in D.C.

     Friday night, October 25, at 8 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Get your green thumb dirty with the last planting of the season: spring bulbs.

     The Friends Committee of the Fort Tryon Park Trust has plenty of gardening to do, so put on long pants and sturdy shoes. Tools and gloves will be provided.

     Groups of more than five must RSVP by sending an email to  info@FortTryonParkTrust.org by October 15.

     Free. Sunday, October 27, from 10 to 2 in the Heather Garden of Fort Tryon Park in Hudson Heights at Margaret Corbin Circle.

 

 

    You won't want to miss Merz Trio, a bold, fiercely creative, prize-winning ensemble, beginning its residency as New England Conservatory's Graduate Piano Trio. 

     Their program will include Mozart's sparkling, delightful C Major Trio, as well as Brahms' stormy and impassioned C Minor Trio. Also featured on the program will be a few excerpts from their upcoming Macbeth show, Charlotte Bray's Those Secret Eyes; and three beautiful canons by Schumann, arranged by Theodor Kirchner for piano trio.

     $15 donation. Monday evening, October 28, at 5 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

 

     For this year’s only Tuesday men’s soccer match, Columbia hosts Fordham.

     Tuesday night, October 29, at 7 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     The Hudson Heights Halloween Parade is where neighborhood children show off their alter egos and then trick or treat among the jack o’ lanterns in Bennett Park.

     Free. Line up at P.S. 187 around 6 on All Hallow’s Eve.

 

 

 

 

 

     Conference play resumes in men’s soccer when the Bulldogs leave New Haven for Uptown to challenge the Lions at home.

     Saturday afternoon, November 2, at 1 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     When an Eli meets a Lion on a soccer pitch, you have seven characters, five letters, and two women’s soccer teams looking for a late-season win.

     Columbia hosts Yale on Saturday evening, November 2, at 5 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

     The jewelry artist Jeanette Caines demonstrates medieval jewelry making, including a closer look at a rare medieval Jewish wedding ring.

     This demonstration is offered for the hour following two special exhibition gallery talks.

No advance reservations are necessary

     Free with museum admission. Sunday afternoon, November 3, at 1 and 3 in the Saint-Guilhem Cloister of The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

     It may seem like old times when Columbia hosts Harvard on the gridiron Uptown.

     Saturday, November 9, at 1 at Wein Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

     The year comes to an end when two conference rivals meet Uptown.

     Columbia hosts Harvard for the conclusion of the regular season of women’s soccer.

     Saturday evening, November 9, at 5 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

     The Crimson come to town for the final home match for the Lions’ men’s soccer.

     Sunday afternoon, November 10, at 1 at the Comissarro Soccer Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Vienna meets the Islands when the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra performs WaHi native Valerie Coleman’s “Afro-Cuban Concerto,” and then presents Mozart’s timeless Clarinet Quintet.

     Closing the program is Arnold Schoenberg’s revolutionary Chamber Symphony, which launched his expressionist style and sparked the creation of the second Viennese School of composers.

     After the Saturday performance you can join the the musicians for a reception featuring local food and a group salsa dance lesson.  

     $5 (at the door, $7); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, November 15, at 8 at Our Savior’s Atonement Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avene at 189th Street, and Saturday afternoon, November 16, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegian Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

 

     Close out the Lions’ home football season against Brown and honor Columbia’s seniors, practicing here on Morningside Heights.

     Saturday afternoon, November 16, at 1 at Wein Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

     Join Yesenia Then Y Jennifer Pacheco for a night of worship at the United Palace of Spiritual Arts.

     $25–$100. Saturday night, November 16, at 7 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Join Met curators and conservators for conversations about the artistic achievements of Hans Greiff, his workshop, and 15th-century metalwork.

      Led by Barbara Drake Boehm and Janis  Mandrus.

      Space is limited. This two-session course is sold as one unit and individual dates cannot be purchased. 

     $175 (includes museum admission). Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, November 19 and 21, from 2 to 4 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     Matan Porat is a sonic storyteller, weaving disparate threads into a musical tapestry that takes listeners through time and space, journeying toward something greater.

     Amid the flickering candles of the Crypt, Porat will present his light-inspired program Lux, with twelve pieces, composed across twelve centuries, tracing the course of a day from dawn to dusk. Each piece possesses its own unique luminescence, beginning with a Gregorian chant for the break of day, ending with Beethoven’s immortal Moonlight sonata, and interspersing works that range from contemporary composers Thomas Adès and Matthias Pintscher to Bartók, Debussy, and Schumann.

         $80. Tuesday night, November 19, at 8 with a wine tasting at 7 in the Crypt under the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     The Chicago-based early music ensemble Schola Antiqua surveys the sound world of Emperor Maximilian I (1459–1519), one of the greatest artistic patrons of the Renaissance.

     The wide-ranging program offers luxuriant vocal music by composers in service to the emperor, as well as poignant works commemorating his death in 1519. Schola Antiqua also explores the breathtaking sound of extremely low voices, which played no small role in Maximilian I's musical experience.

     Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I.

     $65; children, $1 (that’s right). Sunday afternoon, November 24, at 1 and 3 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     On December 4 Benjamin Britten will have been dead 43 years. Generally speaking, it’s tough to track people down after that long, but given the particular proclivity for all things posthumous at the Crypt, musicians managed to find a way with some help from violinist Mari Lee and her ensemble of musical gravediggers and spirit conjurors.

     On the anniversary of his death, these performers will summon the spirit of the composer via a program tracing his life through a series of musical movements mixed with read letters and reflections.

     At the heart of the narrative is Britten’s relationship with poet W.H. Auden, and their struggle to find an answer to a question that remains ever-more relevant in our present day: “How can we live in a broken world?”

     $80. Wednesday night. December 4, at 8 with a wine tasting at 7 in the Crypt under the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

Into winter

     Celebrate Alexander Hamilton's birthday!

     You don’t need Broadway tickets for this party, marking a Founding Father’s 262nd birthday (or 264th—no one’s really certain).

     Families will get to participate in fun activities including cupcake decorating.

     Free with museum admission. Sunday, January 12, at noon at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park.

 

 

      If you like outdoor geometry, get on the street for sunrise and sunset when the shadows line up with the streets.

      The “Manhattanhenge” effect works Uptown on days different from the rest of the island’s.

      To see the sun line up with the streets in Hudson Heights (on 181st Street in the photo), where the street grid is aligned differently from most of the borough, get out on April 18; it’s also on August 26 in Hudson Heights Henge. Fort George Henge is on the same dates as Manhattan, and Inwood Henge is on January 23 — the grid there is so katy-wompus that the sun aligns when it is due “south”.

     The effect works below 174th and above 174th if you go east of Broadway (for sunrise: sunset views may be blocked by buildings to the west). So if you want to see Manhattanhenge, as it’s dubbed, hope for clear skies on May 30 and June 12.

     Inwood Henge: Thursday, January 23, at dawn and dusk.

     You can look for the dates in all the city’s neighborhoods on this map from Carto.

 

 

    Slavery is a chilling chapter in the nation’s history, and it happened here in Uptown too.

     The artist Peter Hoffmeister explored the subject through investigations with curators, researchers and historians while spending a year as an artist in residence at a Manhattan farmhouse.

     His exhibition explores the themes and results of slavery in Upper Manhattan. Through March 31.

     In this special event, Hoffmeister holds a conversation with the curator Gabriel de Guzman. Reserve your seat: development@dyckmanfarmhouse.org.

     Free. Saturday afternoon, January 25, at 3 at the Dyckman Family Farmhouse in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.

 

 

     It’s the summer of 1889, and Antonín Dvořák is on fire. He’s just about to begin composing what would become his eighth symphony, and he writes to his friend with unabashed confidence: “It’s going unexpectedly easily … the melodies simply pour out of me!”

     The February concert of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra features melodically bold music from three centuries. Cerón’s “A la caída de la tarde” (At the End of the Afternoon) is a beautifully nostalgic and flowing soundscape from the Dominican classical tradition. Music Director Chris Whittaker presents a new violin concerto for the orchestra’s former concertmaster, Amos Fayette.

     The concert concludes with the sublime and melodious 8th Symphony of Dvořák.
     After the Saturday concert you can drop by a reception to sample local beers.

     $5 ($7 at the door); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, February 7, at 7 at the George Washington Educational Campus in Fort George at 549 Audubon Avenue, and Saturday afternoon, February 8, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Co-op owners whose apartments are their primary homes are eligible to receive a tax rebate, just as owners of real estate receive. Once you have applied for this annual benefit, called the STAR Rebate, you do not need to apply again, but you have to do it yourself—your co-op cannot do it for you.

     The application is due on February 15. More details are here.

 

 

     Music is the theme of the Washington Heights Salsa, Blues and Shamrocks 5K.
     The route is Fort Washington Avenue from Lower WaHi to the Cloisters and back, so prepare for a busy street. In 2015 more than 6,000 runners finished the 3.2-mile race. It’s one that qualifies for entry in the New York City Marathon, in November.
     Fee varies by age and classification. Usually the first Sunday morning in March, starting at J. Hood Wright Park in Lower WaHi.

 

 

     The Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra presents a musical snapshot of a time and place, featuring classical composers living and writing in WaHi.

     You’ll hear Jessica Meyer’s lyrical meditation on quantum mechanics and Peter Gordon’s whimsical post-minimalism, Aaron J. Kernis’ poignant musical response to September 11, 2001, and Žibuoklė Martinaitytė’s dreamy impressionistic sonic landscapes.

     The performance brings together a collection of compelling voices a concert you’ll find only above 155th street.

     When the music ends you can pause at the post-concert reception featuring tastings from neighborhood restaurants.

    $5 (at the door, $7); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, March 20, at 8 at Our Savior’s Atonement Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avene at 189th Street, and Saturday afternoon, March 21, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegian Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Only in New York ...
     One day late in most springs,
The Great and Glorious Grand Army of The Bronx comes together to claim the neighborhood of Marble Hill which, the group suggests, belongs to the only borough on the mainland on the basis that it was annexed by Bronx Borough President James Lyons in the 1930s.
     Care to fight back? Everyone is welcome, even hecklers.
     Free. A Saturday in early May beginning with
pre-invasion cocktails; the battle of Marble Hill commences once the tab is settled.

 

 

     Closing out the season, the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra presents a concert on the theme of destiny. 

     The program features Paul Brantley’s On the Pulse of Morning, Bienvenido Bustamante’s Concierto para Saxofón, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5.

     $5 ($7 at the door); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, May 15, at 7 at the George Washington Educational Campus in Fort George at 549 Audubon Avenue, and Saturday afternoon, May 16, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     After a hiatus of a couple of years, the Inwood Shakespeare Festival is plotting its return with Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard for its 19th season.
     Chekhov’s final comedic dramatic masterpiece is a bittersweet study of Russia’s elite as it adjusts to rapid social changes at the turn of the 20th century.
     Oh, and what about Shakespeare? Romeo & Juliet is one of the considerations. 
     The performances will debut in June. In the meantime, if you’d like to help support the festival, send a donation the Moose Hall Theatre Company, at
     25 Indian Road, Studio LA
     NYC 10034-1016
     Free. June in Inwood Hill Park.

 

 

     The annual Drums Along the Hudson began in 2002 as a traditional Pow Wow to celebrate Native American heritage and culture, and also to commemorate the Lenape people who first inhabited Inwood Hill Park, or Shorakapok (“edge of the water”).

     The event features dancers and drummers from around the world, combining Native American heritage, culture and art with the diversity of New York City. Activities include a Tree of Peace planting, international cuisine, Native American storytelling, a Pow Wow and crafts.
     The event has attracted a growing audience, numbering from 400 in the first year to over 8,000 in recent years.
     Free. A Sunday in June in Inwood Hill Park at Indian Road and 218th Street.

 

 

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447 Ft. Washington Owners’ Corp.
447 Ft. Washington Ave, Apt. 68
New York, NY 10033
(212) 896-8600
board@thepinehurst.org

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