Events in the Neighborhood, March 27–April 2

Hudson Heights, Audubon Terrace, and Inwood

Wednesday

     Columbia lacrosse hosts Wagner this week.

     Wednesday night at 6 on the Robert Kraft Field of the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday

3 Part Variation #6, Joanna Pousette-Dart, 2013

     The American Academy of Arts and Letters honors the nation’s best artists and belle-lettrists, when it opens its doors to the public we are invited to view the annual Invitiational Exhibition of Visual Arts,

     In April, the Exhibition of Works by Newly Elected Members and Recipients of Honors and Awards will open.

     Thursday through Sunday afternoons through April 9, from 1 to 4 at the galleries in the Academy’s headquarters on Audubon Terrace, just off Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

       Are you fired up? Worried? Do you want to actually do something?

     This weekly meetup provides a space for you to work on any political or resistance action you wish. There’s no set program—you could blog, make a poster, plan future actions, or learn about what others are doing.

      At your disposal will be as many materials as possible, including lists of action ideas, paper, stamps, envelopes, government contact info, and art supplies.

     Help with supplies is appreciated. Check for occasional scheduling changes.

     Free. Thursday nights from 6 to 9 at Word Up Community Book Shop/Librería Comunitaria in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street.

 

 

Friday

     Join NYC Parks as they celebrate Women’s History Month with a night of creativity and conversation.

     This painting session will take as inspiration the works of Georgia O’Keeffe. 

     Be aware that the session is popular and space is limited. Please make a reservation by emailing Celine.Melendez@parks.nyc.gov. Contact (212) 360-1430 or accessibility@parks.nyc.gov for more information regarding accessibility. Requests for special accommodations should be made by March 28.

     Free. Friday night from 6 to 9 at the Highbridge Recreation Center in Lower WaHi in Highbridge Park on Amsterdam Avenue between 173rd and 174th Streets.

 

 

     For Mozart, Vienna meant liberation, the freedom to push the boundaries of his art without the strictures of an aristocratic employer.

     His magic shines in works from his happiest years as a freelancer, including a rarely heard arrangement for oboe and strings of the G major piano trio which was unfinished at the time of his death, alongside a quartet by his good friend and mentor Franz Joseph Haydn.

     House of Time is joined once again for this exciting program by the electrifying Canadian violinist Aisslinn Nosky, and Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment principal violist Max Mandel.

     $10. Friday night at 7:30 in The Lounge at Hudson View Gardens (under the sidewalk shed) in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

     Join Robert Siegel, the host of NPR’s “All Things Considered,” for a lively conversation about politics and the role of the media in the age of Trump.

     All proceeds from the event will benefit Marble Hill Nursery School, a nonprofit parent cooperative nursery school in (ahem) the Bronx. General admission: $30 in advance, $40 at the door; VIP admission $50 (includes preferred seating and pre-event reception).

     $30; at the door, $40; private reception and special seating, $50. Friday night at 8 at Out Saviour’s Atonement Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

Saturday

     Listen to a reading from Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology, by Leah Remini, and take part in the discussion that follows.
     Bold, brash, and bravely confessional, Troublemaker chronicles Remini’s remarkable journey toward emotional and spiritual freedom, both for herself and for her family. This is a memoir designed to reveal the hard-won truths of a life lived honestly—from an author unafraid of the consequence.

     Free. Saturday morning at 11 at the Fort Washington branch of the public library in Fort George on 179th Street between St. Nicholas and Audubon Avenues.

 

 

     The boys of summer take the field for their first home game of the season when the Lions host the Crimson in a season’s conference-opening double-header. It will be an uphill climb for Columbia, which is 2–12 this year.

     Saturday afternoon at noon and 3 on Robertson Field at Satow Stadium in Inwood.

     The women’s softball team hosts Harvard in a double-header at 12:30 and 2:30.

 

 

 

 

     Look out for lacrosse: Columbia hosts Hofstra this weekend.

     Saturday night at 7 on the Robert Kraft Field of the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

     Mark Women’s History Month with a presentation on women and chocolate, part of the exhibition Taste of Chocolate at the Morris-Jumel Mansion.

     Curator Carol S. Ward will discuss women’s changing roles in importing, distributing and consuming everyone’s favorite sweet.

     For more information and to make a reservations, please contact publicprograms@morrisjumel.org.

     $15; members and students, $10. Saturday afternoon at 2 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace. Rescheduled from last week.

 

 

Sunday

     Conference play continutes this weekend with Darmoth as the seoncd team visiting for a double-header against Columbia.

     Sunday afternoon at noon and 3 on Robertson Field in Satow Stadium in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

    Meet up with a group of knitters and crochet enthusiasts to work on your project or start a new one.

     If you’re new to the craft someone will be ready to show you the way.

     Free. Sunday afternoon at noon and 3 at the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum in Inwood on Dyckman Street at 205th Street. Also on April 9 at 3 and Thursday evening, April 27, from 6 to 8.

 

 

     The Skyline League’s Tri-Match series brings a double-header to Yeshiva.

     First, the Macs host St. Joseph’s College at noon, followed by a match against Mount Saint Vincent at 4.

     Sunday afternoon in Fort George at Yeshiva University in the Max Stern Gym.

 

 

 

     Join fellow cinéasts to watch classic movies and discuss them.

     The revisionist Western from director Robert Altman, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, is this month’s feature.

     From 1971, it tells the story of a gambler and a prostitute who become business partners in a remote Old West mining town. Their enterprise thrives until a large corporation arrives on the scene. Starring Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, René Auberjonois and Michael Murphy. Rated R.

     Free. Sunday afternoon at 2 at the Inwood branch of the public library on Broadway between Dyckman and Academy Streets.

 

 

     Do androids dream of electric sheep?

     Get closer to the answer at a screening of the 1982 cult classic, Bladerunner, when the United Palace of Creative Arts series showcases the wonder of science fiction.

     This will be one of your last chances to see it in a theater because the print will be blacked out soon in advance of the sequel, Bladerunner 2049, which will be released in October.

     The story takes place in 2019, and this is the 2007 “Final Cut” version.

     $10; children and seniors, $5. At the door: $15 and $10. Sunday afternoon at 5 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

    

Continuing in the neighborhood

     Every Saturday (weather permitting), Northern Manhattan Parks Inwood Astronomy Project offers free star and planet gazing in Inwood Hill Park. These free, family-friendly events aim to spread the joys of the evening sky, and help you to learn more about the nature of our Solar System and current happenings in Astronomy.
     This week’s sky updates come from
StarDate.
     Saturday nights from 8 to 10 on the ball fields near Seaman Avenue and Isham Street in Inwood. A
map is here.

 

 

     One of the few independent book stores in Upper Manhattan hosts a weekly event open to all. The American Folk Heritage Circle features storytellers from a wide array of backgrounds and traditions.
     Free. Tuesday nights at 7 in Sister’s Uptown Bookstore, at 1942 Amsterdam Avenue (at 156th Street) in Lower WaHi.

 

 

    The Inwood greenmarket is a year-round neighborhood favorite.
    People of all ages, backgrounds, and tastes gather each Saturday to meet and greet their friends and neighbors and do their weekly shopping. Even on the coldest, darkest winter Saturdays, loyal Inwood shoppers come out because they know they can’t get products like this anywhere else.
     A core group of 15 farmers attends every week of the year, and during the peak of the season, five more join to round out the offerings with the summer’s bounty.
     Saturdays from 8 to 3 on
Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

     From late spring through the late autumn, a greenmarket in Lower WaHi offers Mexican herbs, peppers, and greens, honey, cheese, juice pressed from ripe orchard fruit, produce grown in the rich soil of Orange County’s “Black Dirt” region, pastries and fresh bread. You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     Thursdays starting in June on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

     Clean out your closets and recycle at the same time.
     Bring clean and dry textiles like clothing, paired shoes, towels, sheets, scarves, hats, bags and belts for reuse or recycling. Sponsored by
Grow NYC.
     Free. Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Inwood Greenmarket (in Inwood Hill Park) on Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

 

     After sitting closed for more than 40 years, The High Bridge—New York City’s oldest standing bridge—is open. Explore this iconic landmark that connects pedestrians and bicyclists from Manhattan and the Bronx.
     The High Bridge connects the neighborhoods of Washington Heights and Highbridge in the Bronx, and is accessible from both boroughs.
     Free. Daily from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Enter from Highbridge Park, in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue in the 170s.

 

 

     The power of art to make an emotional connection is on display every Sunday afternoon in Apartment 3F—that’s Marjorie Eliot’s place, where she invites veteran musicians to play along. 

     Famous and up-and-coming artists perform at Eliot’s weekly sessions and her free concerts are legendary among jazz aficionados.

     Free. Sunday afternoons at 4 at 555 Edgecombe Avenue, Apt. 3F, in Lower WaHi.

 

 

Planning ahead

     Shhh! There’s a secret performance planned but we can’t tell you who’s playing. That’s because it’s so secret, even we don’t know.

     But we can tell you that it’s part of a series that aims to take live music to small spaces more intimate than concert halls—and cheaper, too.

     Get your name on the list here.

     Monday night, April 3, around 8:30 at a historic movie palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway awfully close to 175th Street.

 

 

     On April 4, 1984, Winston Smith began his rebellion oppressive government by keeping a forbidden diary, hiding it, above all, from Big Brother.

      George Orwell’s novel has been filmed before, but the version with John Hurt and Richard Burton was released in the year for which it was named: 1984.

     On National Screening Day, more than 160 movie theaters across the U.S. will screen this adaptation of a future controlled by a totalitarian government.

     The film will be the premiere screening in the United Palace’s grand lobby, with seats for only 100 people. Make your reservation here.

     Free. Tuesday night, April 4, at the Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     You’ve driven it countless times, but have you ever walked along the Hudson from home to the Bronx?

     The Shorewalkers lead a six-mile trek over the Henry Hudson Bridge and hills, for a journey of about four to 5 hours ended at Wave Hill. 

     Take a lunch, water, binoculars or camera with optical zoom lens.

     Questions? Call the walk leader, Tom McBreen, until Friday evening at 9 at (516) 812-0156, or on the day of walk at (516) 239-8073.

     Free. Saturday morning, April 8, at 9. Meet at Margaret Corbin Circle in Hudson Heights, at the street-level entrance to the A Train). Heavy rain cancels.

 

 

 

     The three-acre Heather Garden is the site of an annual rite of spring: the Shearing of the Heather by members of the Northeast Heather Society and Heather Garden staff.

     Led by a bagpiper, a community parade through the garden delights children, who are invited to take an instrument with them (adults are, too). Throughout the morning you will learn why Fort Tryon Park has the largest heath and heather collection in the northeast, and how to propagate your own heathers with clippings from the shearing.
     For kids, there’s a historical scavenger hunt, flower-themed crafts and face painting.

     Free. Saturday morning, April 8, at the garden in Fort Tryon Park, near the entrance at Margaret Corbin Circle in Hudson Heights.

 

 

     There’s more lacrosse on tap when the Lions get back to conference play and host the Elis.

     Saturday afternoon, April 8, at 1 on the Robert Kraft Field of the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

     The six men of Lionheart perform medieval chant, Renaissance polyphony, and contemporary works inspired by those traditions in a new program of music for Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Easter.

     $40. Sunday afternoon, April 9, at 1 and 3 in the Fuentidueña Chapel of The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

     In its only non-conference home game of the year, Columbia hosts Monmouth.

     Tuesday afternoon, April 11, at 3:30 on Robertson Field at Satow Stadium in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     The Lions open a four-game homestand against the Big Red Bears of Cornell with the first of two double-headers.

     Saturday afternoon, April 14, at noon and 3 on Robertson Field at Satow Stadium in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     The sun will shine and the water will call.

     Row New York paddlers can’t wait to slather on the sunscreen and get their boats back on the Harlem River.

     The best part? Seeing strangers become a team, and a team turn into long lasting friendships. Since 2004, the group has taught 6th through 12th graders, beginners and competitors. Spend some time this summer rowing with a new crew.

     Adults can choose classes here; information on kids’ classes is here.

     Learn to row: $130 for the one-morning course. Saturday morning, April 15, from 9 to noon at the Peter J. Sharp Boathouse off Swindlers’ Cove in the Harlem River. Also on April 29, June 10 and 17, July 8, 22 and 29, August 5, 9 and 26, and September 9 and 16.

 

 

     The Lenape Indians lived in Inwood Hill for thousands of years.

     Join the Urban Park Rangers and find out how native tribes used the local waterways, native plants, and wildlife to survive.

     Rangers will point out many of those vital plants and animals still found in parks today. Learn how the Lenape legacy lives on today through their words and artifacts still being discovered.

     Registration is required. To save a spot, please visit nyc.gov/parks/rangers/register. Registration opens on April 5. 

     Free. Saturday morning, April 15, at 11 at a spot in Inwood Hill Park that will be emailed to registrants.

 

 

     Pomerium performs its exploration of the great Renaissance choral music of Passiontide and Easter.

     The program proceeds from Palm Sunday to Easter Day with an emphasis on music for Holy Thursday and Good Friday. Stylistically, the program progresses from the austerity of Gregorian chant and its polyphonic elaborations by Du Fay and Senfl, to the intense Lamentations by Robert White and affective evocations of the events of Holy Week by Monteverdi and Gesualdo, to the celebration of the Resurrection in glorious motets by Orlande de Lassus and William Byrd.

      $40. Saturday afternoon, April 15, at 1 and 3 in the Fuentidueña Chapel of The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     Columbia closes out its home season when the Lions host the Quakers.

     Saturday afternoon, April 15, at 1 on the Robert Kraft Field of the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

     Discover the differences between tranquility meditation and insight meditation with Buddhist monk Bhante Sudhaso.

     He will teach you how to use each method to develop concentration and work toward wisdom, and how to free the mind from dissatisfation and discontent.

     Saturday afternoon, April 15, at 4 at the Dyckeman Family Farmhouse in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.

 

 

 

 

     Columbia continues its weekend match-up with Cornell, closing out the weekend with another double-header.

     Sunday afternoon, April 16, at noon and 3 on Robertson Field at Satow Stadium in Inwood.

     Also on Sunday, the Columbia women’s softball team hosts Cornell at a time to be announced later.

 

 

 

     The Third Thursday lecture series at the Dyckman Family Farmhouse gives you “white-gloves access” to the museum’s collection.

     Hosted by Don Rice, the talk is situated on the back porch in warm weather (or, if it’s chilly, in the kitchen by the cozy fireplace).

     Reservations are encouraged.

     Free. Thursday night, April 20, at 6:30 at the farmhouse in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street. Monthly.

 

 

     Brooklyn Baroque, the resident Baroque ensemble of the Morris-Jumel Mansion, returns for its spring concert.

     To book a seat and for additional information, please  publicprograms@morrisjumel.org.

     $30; members and students $25. Saturday afternoon, April 22, at 3 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     Members of the WaHi Chamber Orchestra are featured this season in a new solo recital series.    

     Principal bassoonist Nanci Belmont performs works by Villa-Lobos, Telemann, and Hersant; Violinist Alexandros Petrin performs music by NYC-based composers Kim Sherman and David Noon alongside works by Copland, Ponce, and Velasquez.

          Saturday afternoon, April 22, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at 181st Street.

 

 

     Would you be surprised to hear that the oldest standing house in Manhattan is haunted? That’s the story, anyway.

     Find out for yourself at a paranormal investigation, when you can learn the basics of ghost hunting and, possibly, communicate with early residents of Upper Manhattan.

     $30; members and students, $25. Saturday night, April 22, from 8 to 11 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park. Also on June 24, August 19, and October 28.

 

 

     Celebrate Earth Day by being a great park steward—give back to your park by volunteering with the Friends Committee of the Fort Tryon Park Trust and NYC Parks at a Beautification Day.

     Plants, tools, and gloves will be provided. Wear long pants and sturdy shoes. Volunteers under 18 must be accompanied by an adult.

     Groups must register by sending an email to info@
FortTryonParkTrust.org
no later than April 9.  

     Free. Sunday, April 23, from 10 to 2; meet at the entrance to the Heather Garden at Margaret Corbin Circle in Hudson Heights. Other chances to help: It’s My Park Day on May 21; Park Beautification Day on June 25, July 30 and October 29 (also bulb planting); all  from 10 to 2.

 

  

     New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife.

     Join the Urban Park Rangers as they guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the city’s only untouched, primeval forest and explain an oft-misunderstood newcomer to the New York City area: coyotes.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, April 23, at 1 in the Payson Center in Inwood Hill Park near Payson Avenue and Dyckman Street.

 

 

     Columbia baseball closes out the regular season at home with a double-header against Penn.

     Friday afternoon, April 28, at 1 and 4 on Robertson Field at Satow Stadium in Inwood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Un taller que busca compartir la experiencia del cruce, de quienes dejamos nuestros países y venimos a Nueva York. En este viaje, hemos aprendido a disfrutar lo nuevo, pero también sentimos harta nostalgia. Dirigido a toda persona que quiera contar su historia de viaje (no se necesita saber escribir ni leer). A cargo de Nadia Villafuerte.

     Nadia Villafuerte es narradora mexicana y autora de los libros Barcos en Houston, ¿Te gusta el látex, cielo? y Por el lado salvaje. Ha sido becaria del Fondo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes y de la Fundación para las Letras Mexicanas y fue seleccionada para formar parte de la antología México 20, New Voices, Old Traditions (Pushkin Press, 2015), y Palabras mayores, nueva narrativa mexicana (Malpaso Ediciones, 2015).

      Le gusta la soul food y vive en Harlem.

      Taller gratuito. Sábado, 29 de Abril, de 2 a 4 p.m. Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria. Amsterdam Avenue esquina calle 165.

 

 

     In conjunction with the Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts series, the NOW Ensemble performs in the Music at Our Saviour’s concert season.

     Performance information will be available later.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, April 30, at 5 at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 185th Street.

 

 

     The Hudson View Gardens’ Performing Arts group welcomes the legendary Stanley Drucker, left, the former long-time New York Philharmonic principal clarinetist, two-time Grammy nominee and Guinness world record-holder, and pianist Kazuko Hayami, a two-time “critic’s choice” in Japan who is featured on Drucker’s New York Legends album.

     Having performed with Drucker over many years, Hayami describes her experience as “utterly exciting and full of fun.”

     Donations gladly accepted. Sunday evening, April 30, at 5 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

     See New York City like never before in the Great Saunter, the Shorewalker’s epic urban hike.

     The 32nd annual journey traverses 32 miles of waterfront and more than 20 parks along Manhattan’s incredible shorelines, including Fort Washington Park and Inwood Hill Park.

     Your participation raises awareness of the city’s parks, maintains the Westside promenades, restores the Eastside Greenway, redevelops the Harlem River, and connects the Greenway into a continuous path around the world’s most fascinating island.

     More information, including a map and approximate schedule, are here.

     $25 membership required. Saturday morning, May 6, at 7 at the starting and ending point, Fraunces Tavern.

 

 

     You’re invited to an outdoor concert on the first weekend of each late spring and summer month, with live acoustic music presented on the front porch of the Morris-Jumel Mansion.

     This month’s featured artist is Jenny Bruce.

     For additional information, please email publicprograms@ morrisjumel.org.

     Free. Saturday evening, May 6, from 5 to 6:30 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     The award-winning German vocal ensemble Calmus returns to The Cloisters with a program commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation.

     Featuring choral arrangements of music connected with reformer Martin Luther, from Gregorian chant, medieval and Renaissance composers such as Du Fay, Schein, and Praetorius, the Baroque giant J.S. Bach, romantics Brahms and Mendelssohn and arriving at contemporary composers such as Gunnar Eriksson.

     The concert is a walk through the Christian calendar year, with music for Christmas, Easter, Pentecost, and Advent and ending with settings of Luther’s most enduring and popular hymn, “Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott.”

     $40. Sunday afternoon, May 7, at 1 and 3 in the Fuentidueña Chapel of the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     The Fort Washington Collegiate Choir holds its spring concert, featuring Handel’s “Your Voices Tune,” Copland’s Zion’s Walls, the
5 Hebrew Love Songs by Whitacre, Schubert’s Mass in G major, D.167, “Lullaby” by Elder from Three Nocturnes, and more.
     Tuesday evening, May 9, at 8 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street between Fort Washington Avenue and Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

 

     Inspired by Duke Ellington’s quote proclaiming the Morris-Jumel Mansion the “jewel of Sugar Hill,” the museum’s spring fundraising event aims to transform the Mansion and Roger Morris Park into the hottest social gathering since the Roaring Twenties.
     Guests at the gala may imbibe custom cocktails and sampling hors d'oeuvres while enjoying live music provided by 
The Dewdrop Society. The highlight of the evening will be performances by fan dancer Karina Libido and sideshow performer Adam Realman with special guest host Sir Richard Castle.

     Throughout the night raffle prizes will be awarded and the museum will unveil a recent conservation work.

     $75 to $1,000. Thursday night, May 11, from 7 to 11 at the Mansion on Jumel Terrace.

    
 

     If you like outdoor geometry, get out in the streets for sunrise and sunset when the shadows line up with the streets. Manhattanhenge, as it’s dubbed, happens in May and June, so hope for clear skies. The effect works below 174th, but not in Hudson Heights.

 

 

     There’s more to chocolate than dark and milk!

     Find out the many flavors that come from chocolate, and that chocolate adds to food, in a special tasting event with samples from local chocolatiers.

     Please email publicprograms@morrisjumel.org for more information.

     $30; members and students, $25. Saturday afternoon, May 20, from 3 to 5 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     The WaHi Chamber Orchestra’s final concert of the season features the Grand Prize winner of the 1st annual Young Artists’ Competition.

     The concert opens with a world premiere by our music director, Chris Whittaker, and closes with Mendelssohn's joyful and exuberant Italian Symphony No. 4.

     Reception to follow for Friends of WHCO.

         Saturday afternoon, May 20, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at 181st Street.

 

 

     The spring season of Music at Our Saviour’s concludes with Ensemble Connect playing Beethoven and Mozart.

     Free. Sunday evening, May 21, at 5 at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 185th Street.

 

 

     Only in New York ...
     One afternoon in most springs,
The Great and Glorious Grand Army of The Bronx comes together to claim the neighborhood of Marble Hill which, the group suggests, belongs to the only borough on the mainland on the basis that it was annexed by Bronx Borough President James Lyons in the 1930s.
     Everyone is welcome, even hecklers.
     Free. A Saturday afternoon in May, typically, beginning with
pre-invasion cocktails; the battle of Marble Hill commences soon thereafter.

 

 

     Celebrate the neighborhood’s Colonial history with a sip or two (or more) of a New World spirit.

     To mark the brief period when the Morris-Jumel Mansion served as a tavern, here’s your chance to partake in a discussion and tasting of libations synonymous with the Colonial period: Bourbon.

     For additional information, please email publicprograms @morrisjumel.org.

     $40; members and students (21 and over, please), $30. Thursday night, May 25, from 6 to 8 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace. Also on May 31 from 7:30 to 8:30.

 

 

     A farce fit for all time, Oscar Wilde’s play, The Importance of being Earnest, performed in a historic spot in Upper Manhattan.

     For additional information, please contact publicprograms @morrisjumel.org.

     $30; members, $25; students, $20. Friday through Sunday nights, May 26 through June 11, at 6 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

 

     Here’s your chance to see the innovative VC3—prize-winning cellists—in an intimate setting.

     Elizabeth Anderson, Käthe Jarka and Robert La Rue perform a repertoire spanning the entire Western musical tradition, from works of medieval and Renaissance masters to the music of the present day.

     This new group has garnered acclaim for its accomplished, spirited performances of original works and transcriptions, bringing the multi-cello ensemble into the realm of serious chamber music.

     Sunday evening, May 28, at 5 in The Louge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

     The last farm in the city holds a spring benefit, and the neighborhood is invited.

     Details to come.

     Saturday evening, June 3, from 5 to 7:30 at the Dyckman Family Farmhouse in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.

 

 

 

     Hailing from Canada, the United States, and Taiwan, members of the Ulysses String Quartet call WaHi their home, and from Uptown have performed in Esterházy Palace, Carnegie Hall, and the Taiwan National Concert Hall. For this concert, they don’t stray far from Quisqeya Heights.

     The quartet offers interactive programs and workshops for all ages that demystify traditional repertoire while introducing new and exciting works. Their programs invite participants to learn about the inner workings of the string quartet, and explore connections that music makes with our world today, through the rich history of its creation.

     $10. Saturday night, June 3, at 8 at Holy Trinity Church in Inwood at 20 Cumming Street between Seaman Avenue and Broadway.

 

 

     You’re invited to an outdoor concert on the first weekend of each late spring and summer month, with live acoustic music presented on the front porch of the Morris-Jumel Mansion.

     This month’s featured artist is Julia King.

     For additional information, please email publicprograms@ morrisjumel.org.

     Free. Sunday evening, June 4, from 5 to 7 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Relive the 1975 bank heist classic, starring Al Pacino and directed by Sydney Lumet.

     Deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the Library of Congress, the film will be screened as part of the United Palace Theatre’s wonder of heroes series.

     $10; children and seniors, $5, in advance. Sunday afternoon, June 4, at 5 at the United Palace Theatre in lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

Summer and beyond

     Looking for the Inwood Shakespeare Festival?

     After 17 years, the company, Moose Hall, had to leave its performance space on the penimsula of Inwood Hill Park after grilling was introduced in the park, creating hazards for the cast and crew.

     They plan to return with Dracula, but not as the Inwood Shakespeare Festival. Instead, the troupe will move downtown for performances in the autumn.

     Want to keep Shakespeare a free presence Uptown? Here’s a list of who you can contact on the festival’s behalf.

 

 

     Ease into summer with the Eddie Murphy comedy Coming to America. Released in 1988, the rags-to-riches tale comes to life on the big screen in Uptown’s famous rococo auditorium.

     $10; children and seniors, $5, in advance. Sunday afternoon, June 25, at a time to be announced later but likely at 5 in the United Palace Theater in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     Celebrate the nation’s musical heritage at Manhattan’s oldest house while enjoying a selection of red and white wines and local bluegrass artists.

     For additional information, contact publicprograms@ morrisjumel.org.

     $30; members and students (21 and older, please) $25. Thursday night, June 29, at 7 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     You’re invited to an outdoor concert of live acoustic music presented on the front porch of the Morris-Jumel Mansion.

     This month’s featured artist is George Masone, with the added treat of a Cuban rum tasting, hearkening back to the days when the mansion served as a tavern.

     For additional information, please email publicprograms@ morrisjumel.org.

     The concert is free. The rum tasting isn’t: $40, members and students (21 and older, please) $30. Sunday evening, July 2, from 5 to 6:30 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Row New York paddlers can’t wait to slather on the sunscreen and get their boats back on the Harlem River.

     Since 2004, the group has taught 6th through 12th graders, beginners and competitors. Spend some time this summer rowing with a new crew.

     Adults can choose classes here; information on kids’ classes is here.

     Learn to row: $130 for the one-morning course. Saturday morning, July 8, from 9 to noon at the Peter J. Sharp Boathouse off Swindlers’ Cove in the Harlem River. Also on July 22 and 29, August 5, 9 and 26, and September 9 and 16.

 

 

     Mark the anniversary of the notorious duel between Vice President Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the former secretary of the treasury, with a reenactment suggesting  how the event may have transpired between two enemies.

     They met near Weehawken, below the Palisades. Burr was the better shot on the morning of July 11, 1804, fatally wounding Hamilton, who died the next day.

     For additional information, please email publicprograms @morrisjumel.org.

     Free. Saturday afternoon, July 8, at 2 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Celebrate George Washington’s famous cabinet dinner while contributing to the Morris-Jumel Mansion’s continued programming efforts at this fund-raising dinner.

     For additional information, contact publicprograms @morrisjumel.org.

     $100. Sunday night, July 9, at 6 at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Looks like they’re going to need a bigger boat.

     The film that cleared beaches and grossed the largest box office of any movie until then, Jaws returns to a theater near you.

     Released in 1975 and based on Peter Benchley’s 1974 book, the film is considered a classic.

          $10; children and seniors, $5, in advance. Sunday afternoon, August 6, at a time to be announced later but likely at 5 in the United Palace Theater in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     Enjoy a weekend of classic jazz, brought to you by local icon Marjorie Eliot and Parlor Entertainment, and hosted by the Morris-Jumel Mansion.

     For additional information, please email publicprograms@morrisjumel.org.

     Free. Saturday and Sunday afternoons, August 19 and 20, at the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

 

     The Medieval Festival is the most famous event in the Heights, drawing tens of thousands of visitors on a late September Sunday.

     Lords, ladies, knights and commoners converge in Fort Tryon Park in the area around the Cloisters.

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Row New York paddlers can’t wait to slather on the sunscreen and get their boats back on the Harlem River.

      Since 2004, the group has taught 6th through 12th graders, beginners and competitors. Spend some time this summer rowing with a new crew.

     Adults can choose classes here; information on kids’ classes is here.

     Learn to row: $130 for the one-morning course. Saturday morning, September 9, from 9 to noon at the Peter J. Sharp Boathouse off Swindlers’ Cove in the Harlem River. Also on September 16.

 

 

     Celebrate the brief period in which the Morris-Jumel Mansion served as a tavern in a discussion and tasting of libations synonymous with the Colonial period. This month’s focus is Scotch.

     For additional information, contact publicprograms @morrisjumel.org.

$40; members and students (21 and older, please) $30. Thursday night, September 21, at 6 the mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     The Cultural and Arts Festival connects you with the array of artists and vendors who make Upper Manhattan a cultural destination. 

     For additional information, contact publicprograms @morrisjumel.org.

     Free. Saturday, October 14, from 11 to 6 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     Steel yourself for a blood-curdling performance of Dracula to mark the season. Watch it in Manhattan’s oldest house—one reputed to be haunted.

     $30; members, $25; students, $20. Friday and Saturday nights, October 20 to 28, and Sunday night, October 29, at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park on Jumel Terrace.

     Feast first with a one-night-only dinner performance. Thursday night, October 26, at 7.

     For additional information, contact publicprograms@morrisjumel.org.

 

 

 

     The standard-bearer of the camp horror film is back.

     Night of the Living Dead may terrify you or it may induce chuckles. After all, there’s a reason it’s a cult classic.

     Saturday afternoon, October 29, at a time to be announced later (but probably at 5) at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

   Some residents say that the shrieks and wails of the forgotten souls of Inwood’s asylums and institutions, long-since dark, still reverberate through Inwood Hill Park.

    True or not, the tale sets the scene for a frightful Uptown Halloween.

     A kids’ parade in Hudson Heights contributes to the eerie night.

 

 

 

     2017 marks the 241st anniversary of the Battle of Fort Washington, a key event during the Revolutionary War. Be transported back in time and celebrate your local history.

     The Brigade of the American Revolution will perform and lead drills. Come watch a blacksmith demonstration, listen to live 18th-century music, make arts and crafts and play games from the revolutionary period. Tour the battle scene with a tour guide dressed as heroine Margaret Corbin. 
     Prizes will be offered for the most authentic costumes.

     Free. The Sunday after Veterans’ Day (usually) on the café lawn in Fort Tryon Park (enter from Margaret Corbin Circle in Hudson Heights).

 

 

     The Feast of St. Frances Cabrini honors the patron saint of immigrants, who welcomed newcomers to Upper Manhattan and whose remains are venerated in a shrine in Hudson Heights.

     Over a weekend in mid-November, the St. Frances Xavier Shrine hosts a series of masses for several nations’ communities, a procession and a neighborhood gathering.

     Free. At the Shrine in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at Margaret Corbin Circle.

 

 

     Meridionalis performs music from the Olmeda Collection at The Hispanic Society Museum & Library in a concert dedicated to polychoral music by composers such as Tomás Luis de Victoria, Juan de Madrid, Mateo Romero, Diego de Cáseda and Manuel de Egüs.

     Music for multiple choirs of voices and instruments was an important part of Spanish liturgical music throughout the baroque period. The main cathedrals in all corners of the empire regularly presented imposing music that took advantage of the space and acoustics of the temples.

     A reception will follow. Seating is limited; reserve your space at events@hispanicsociety.org.

     Friday night, December 8, at 7 at the Society on Audubon Terrace off Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     The Hispanic Society Museum & Library and The American Irish Historical Society present Juilliard’s  Apex Brass Quintet.

     Apex delves into Medieval and Renaissance vocal works, arranged by trumpeter Kevin Quill. All members of Apex Brass are current students at The Juilliard School in New York City.

     A reception will follow. Seating is limited, so reserve your space: events@hispanicsociety.org.

     Thursday night, December 14, at 7 at the Society on Audubon Terrace off Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     Holiday shopping invariably means higher prices. What if you bought for your true love everything mentioned in a famous carol?

     The good news for traditional shoppers last year: the price of the gifts mentioned in The Twelve Days of Christmas increased only 0.7 percent, despite the surge in cost of turtle doves. (Really!)

     Prices for drummers and gold rings go up and down. Here’s where to find the prices for 2017.

 

 

     Co-op owners whose apartments are their primary homes are eligible to receive a tax rebate, just as owners of real estate receive. Once you have applied for this annual benefit, called the STAR Rebate, you do not need to apply again, but you have to do it yourself—your co-op cannot do it for you.

     The application is due on February 15. More details are here.

 

 

     Promoting filmmakers from Upper Manhattan, the Inwood Film Festival has recognized creative movies made in the neighborhood since 2015.

     Entries must be submitted by mid-winter, with the festival running over a weekend in Inwood in mid-March.

 

 

     Music is the theme of the rechristened Washington Heights Salsa, Blues and Shamrocks 5K.
     The route is Fort Washington Avenue from Lower WaHi to the Cloisters and back, so prepare for a busy street. In 2015 more than 6,000 runners finished the 3.2-mile race. It’s one that qualifies for entry in the New York City Marathon, in November.
     Fee varies by age and classification. A Sunday morning in early March starting at J. Hood Wright Park in Lower WaHi.

 

 

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Board of Directors

447 Ft. Washington Owners’ Corp.
447 Ft. Washington Ave, Apt. 68
New York, NY 10033
(212) 896-8600
board@thepinehurst.org

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