Washington Heights Events: September 19–25

Monday

     The Parks Department has two reconstruction projects starting in Fort Tryon Park:
     • The Bennett Avenue Rockface Stabilization

     • Select pathway reconstruction.

     Expect some temporary pathway closures and Bennett Avenue parking changes. More information can be found on NYC Parks’ Capital Projects Tracker.

     Continuing in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     Back by popular demand!

     Weather permitting, the Jazz WaHi ensemble resumes playing tunes outdoors in the park.

     Take a blanket or lawn chairs, and a snack too, to enjoy Uptown musicians jamming for you.

     Free. Monday afternoons at 4 in Bennett Park in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

     The Overlook is a string quartet of Upper Manhattan residents who formed during the early days of the pandemic to amplify the work of Black composers from the past and present.  

     They perform this week in their second annual music fesitval.

     The musicians are four of the city’s most accomplished string players, featuring violinists Monica Davis and Ravenna Lipchik, violist Angela Pickett, and cellist Laura Metcalf.

     Free. Monday night at 7 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

Tuesday

     Support your health by shopping at a farmers’ market.

     From late spring through the late autumn, the Fort Washington Greenmarket in Lower WaHi offers Mexican herbs, peppers, and greens, honey, cheese, juice pressed from ripe orchard fruit, produce grown in the rich soil of Orange County’s “Black Dirt” region, pastries and fresh bread.

     Tuesdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

     A New York farmers’ market offers fresh fruit and vegetables from the Hudson Valley, the Garden State and beyond.

 

 

     Over 60 and want to excercise with your crew?

     Columbia invites you for wellness walks and fitness sessions, organized around incentives and rewards for your effort.

     The weekly workouts are held indoors—on the world’s fastest indoor track. (Cleats not required.) To sign up, call (212) 305-9483.

      Free. Tuesday mornings starting from 10 to 11:30 at the Armory in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

Wednesday

     The poor in American are often told that if they want food security, all they have to do is grow their own vegetables, give up soda and exercise. It’s as if, by magic, eating vegetables and drinking water are going to solve the problems in the food system, without looking at the institutional, environmental and structural determinants that reinforce racism in today’s society.
     How has the Covid-19 changed the way people now think?
     The farmer and activist Karen Washington, who’s also a James Beard award winner, will make the case that there’s a lot more to food security that we expect.
     It’s the second presentation in the lecture series Talking About Race Matters, with the theme of decolonizing food. Register and dyckmanfarmhouse.org.
     Free. Wednesday evening at 6:30 on Zoom.
 
 

Thursday

     Care to compost?

     The city maintains a weekly collection site. They’re collecting your contributions every Thursday from 7 a.m. to noon.

     Yes to Fruit and vegi scraps, non-greasy food scraps, rice, pasta, bread, grains, cereal, coffee grounds, tea bags, egg shells, nuts, cut flowers, houseplants, soiled brown paper.

     No to meat, fish, bones, dairy, fat, oil, greasy food scraps, animal waste, charcoal, coconuts, insect-infested plants, plastics, twist ties, rubber bands, receipts.

     Thursdays before noon, on the corner of 181st Street and Fort Washington Avenue in Hudson Heights, next to the community fridge.

 

     The genesis for Kathleen Hollway’s recent photography series comes from all of the changes society has gone through in the past few years. The pandemic forced many people to work from home, wear masks to cover their faces, and to keep socially distant from family, friends, and neighbors.
     The mutual isolation has changed our society and ourselves in profound ways. Yet as we start going back to normal, what we once knew of our surrounding world is now altered. The familiar has become unfamiliar.
     Join the gallery opening with a glass of wine.
     Free. Thursday evening at 5 at the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.
 
 

Friday

     American Travelers: A Watercolor Journey Through Spain, Portugal, and Mexico, a new exhibition at the Hispanic Society, focuses on major watercolors by American artists who painted in Spain, Portugal, and Latin America. The paintings were created by Childe Hassam, Max Kuehne, George Wharton Edwards, Ernest Clifford Peixotto, Florence Vincent Robinson, Orville Houghton Peets and Milan Petrovic.

     The show also includes a suite of contemporary watercolor paintings by the California artist Timothy J. Clark (b. 1951), best known for his large watercolor paintings.

     Free. At the Hispanic Society Museum & Library on Audubon Terrace on Broadway at 175th Street. Through October 16.

 

     Explore the sights, sounds, and scents of The Met Cloisters’ gardens.

     Learn how medieval plants and gardens served medicinal, artistic, and even magical purposes while enjoying the unparalleled setting of the Cloisters.

     Space is limited; first come, first served. The tour lasts an hour, so wear a hat or sunscreen.

     Free with Museum admission. Monday, Friday, and Saturday afternoons at 1. Meet in the Main Hall. Through September.

 

Saturday

    The Inwood greenmarket is a year-round neighborhood favorite.
    People of all ages, backgrounds, and tastes gather each Saturday to meet and greet their friends and neighbors and do their weekly shopping. Even on the coldest, darkest winter Saturdays, loyal Inwood shoppers come out because they know they can’t get products like this anywhere else.
     A core group of 15 farmers attends every week of the year, and during the peak of the season, five more join to round out the offerings with the summer’s bounty.

     The collection of food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling is on hiatus during the pandemic.
     Saturdays from 8 to 3 on
Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street. Open year-round.

 

 

     Trees have a special place in our environment, benefitting animals, other plants, and pleasing our eyes.

     Join the Urban Park Rangers for a 90-minute hike through  Inwood Hill Park in search of various species and to learn some ways to identify these treesas autumn begins.

     Wear comfortable shoes and take a bottle of water.

     Free. Saturday morning at 11; meet at Seaman Avenue and Isham Street.

 

 

     Step into Hispanic Heritage Month with a live performance.
     Jugando N Play presents In My Dreams/En Mis Sueños, an outdoor, multilingual, interactive theater piece. Reserve a seat
here.

     Free. Two performances Saturday, at noon and 2, at the Hispanic Society and Museum on Audubon Terrace on Broadwat at 155th Street.
 
 

Sunday

 

     Relax and restore with a morning of yoga and meditation at a private Uptown garden.

     All levels are welcome for a one-hour class led by Kai. Take a mat and some water.

     Free. Sunday morning at 9 at the Riverside-Inwood Neighborhood Garden at 236 Dyckman Street at the confluence of Riverside Drive and Broadway.

 

 

     The power of art to make an emotional connection is on display every Sunday afternoon in Apartment 3F—that’s Marjorie Eliot’s place, where she invites veteran musicians to play along. 

     Famous and up-and-coming artists perform at Eliot’s weekly sessions and her free concerts are legendary among jazz aficionados.

     Join her live—in her home for Parlor Jazz.

     Free. Sunday afternoons at 3:30 at 555 Edgecomb Avenue, Apartment 3F, in Lower WaHi at 160th Street.

 

 

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Not so quiet, please!

      Among the things WaHi is famous for is the noise. Lots of it!

      But does it seem eerily quiet now? You may not miss the auditory assaults, but the sounds of people mingling and waiters serving are becoming memories.

      Refresh yours with the New York Public Library’s new online album: Missing Sounds of New York. It probably won’t win any Grammys, but each track uses a combination of sounds to create familiar canvases on which mini stories are placed: a glass breaking in a bar, a dance performance on the subway, an overly enthusiastic baseball fan.

      It’s free and it’s available from the library. (No need for a library card!)

 

 

Planning ahead

     With the pandemic waning, the United Palace resumes its tours of the theater’s spectacular interior. Get an informed perspective on the stunning 3,400-seat auditorium, the ornate mezzanine, grand foyer, balcony, and if you’re lucky, the stage.

     The history of United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth-largest theater, began in 1930 when it was then one of five Loew’s Wonder Theaters across the boroughs and New Jersey. Designed by the noted architect Thomas Lamb (Cort Theatre, the former Ziegfeld Theater) with interiors overseen by decorative specialist Harold Rambusch (Waldorf Astoria, Radio City Music Hall), it was one of the region’s premier vaudeville and movie houses.

    $18.34. Occasionally at the theater in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

     The High Bridge—New York City’s oldest standing bridge—is a landmark that connects walkers and cyclists with Manhattan and the Bronx.
     The High Bridge is a path from the neighborhoods of Washington Heights to Highbridge across the river, and is accessible from both boroughs.
     Free. Daily from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Enter from Highbridge Park, in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue in the 170s.

 

 

     The  Fort Fridge seeks weekly donations of perishable food and non-perishable pantry items to help our neighbors who are experiencing food insecurity. Please consider contributing:
     • Fresh fruits and veggies, milk, rice, beans, pasta, cheese singles, cereal bread, peanut butter
     • Prepared foods must be in to-go containers that are sealed and labeled with the date they were prepared and their potential allergens: wheat, soy, milk, eggs, nuts, fish or shellfish
     • Toiletries, feminine hygiene products, infant care items, hand sanitizer, masks, etc.
     The fridge is on Fort Washington Avenue just above 181st Street, in front of the Fort Washington Collegiate Church. Questions? Send them to FortFridge@gmail.com.
 
 

     Treasures from the Iberian peninsula await at the Hispanic Society Library and Museum, on Audubon Terrace in Lower WaHi.

 

     The Crypt Sessions return when the Death of Classical series resumes for an intimate concert experience with one of today’s most extraordinary and impactful musical change agents.

     Superstar violinist Lara St. John returns to the crypt with her fierce, firey and uncompromising artistry. She’ll be performing music from her new album ♀she/her/hers, part of St. John's larger mission to fight for women's rights and historically marginalized groups and to offer a voice to the voiceless.

     A wine and cheese reception preceeds the concerts.

     $85. Thursday night, September 29, at 7:30 and 9 in the crypt of the Church of the Inercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

    

    

      Formed in 2018, the Leadlights ensemble performs chamber music with a modern twist. Its summer concert series, Rising in the Heights, plays out on Upt0wn sidewalks and concludes with an early autmn performance, when Morgan Boyle, an NYPL librarian, reads Coquí in the City, by Nomar Perez.

     Free. Friday evening, September 30, at 5 at the Word Up Community Bookshop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street.

 

 

     A farmhouse is the perfect place to celebrate the best season of the year. A family-friendly event starts at 11 and runs to 3.

     Starting at 4, you can enjoy Oktoberfest beer from Dyckman Beer Company as you listen to Lyl Harper's unique steel drum sounds. Throughout the farmhouse and gardens, you can play lawn games such as corn hole and giant jenga.
    For those 21 and older. The ticket price includes two drinks and two hours of steel drum music. Additional drinks may be purchased at the festival.
     $20. Saturday afternoon, October 1, from 4 to 6 at the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.
 

     Come to Manhattan’s oldest house after dark for a unique tour of the historic Morris-Jumel Mansion by candlelight (don’t worry, it’s a fake candle).

     You will be guided through the grounds and house while learning about its history, and hear spooky stories of the spirits who may still inhabit the house.

     The erie ghost tour includes exclusive access to the third floor attic with original flooring, and is designed for guests over the age of 13.

     Limited to 20 brave souls. This tour shares ghost stories of the house and is not a full paranormal investigation.

     $37.95. Saturday night, October 1, at 6:30 at the Mansion on Jumel Terrace.  Note that the gates will be closed and locked at 6:35 and no entry will be permitted after that time. Also on October 21 and 28.

 

 

     Looking for a tchotchke for the corner of your apartment? Or maybe a handy gewgaw for the kitchen?

     The annual flea market at the Riverside-Inwood Neighborhood Garden is the place to search for it.

     On the other hand, iIf you're interested in being a vendor, fill out this form.

     Saturday, October 8, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the garden at the confluence of Broadway, Riverside Drive, and Dyckman Street. Rain date: October 15.

 

 

     Made famous in The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge, the shorekeeper at Jeffrey’s Hook invites you to a party.

     Celebrate Manhattan’s only remaining lighthouse with readings of the famous children’s book, fishing clinics, live music, food and art vendors, Urban Park Ranger presentations, and the chance to climb to the top.

     The climb to the top, however, may not happen. Patch reported in September that the lighthouse is rusting and in need of repairs, which may prevent the structure from being open. The festival, on the other hand, will go on as scheduled.

     Free. Saturday, October 8, from noon to 4 in Fort Washington Park.

 

 

     Mixing traditional lyricism with modern reggaeton, Sebastián Yatra brings his romantic lyrics to Uptown on his Dharma tour.

     The Colombian singer and songwriter began as a pop artist, recording ballads when he started.

     $66.15 to $462.10. Saturday night, October 8, at 8 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     In 1967, an Inwood native and marine veteran was drinking with friends in an Inwood bar when one of them suggested taking beers and good cheer to their buddies fighting in Vietname.     

     John Donohue took the idea and ran with it. From his perch in Doc Fiddler’s, an Inwood bar that later went by the name The Red Barrel, he spent eight weeks getting to the war zone to deliver cans of Pabst Blue Ribbon.

     The adventure has been made into a film, The Greatest Beer Run Ever, which opens September 30. It’s getting a special screening at the Tuby Hook Bar. The film stars Zac Efron, Russel Crowe, and Bill Murray, and you can reserve a space by calling (212) 569-7071 or sending an email to the bar at info@tubbyhooktavern.com.

     Saturday night, October 8, at 8 at the bar in Inwood on Broadway near 207th Street.

 

 

     The opening concert in the Music at Our Saviour’s Atonement series invites you to explore the ricochet effect of the Renaissance and Baroque.

     Three Uptown friends share their love of gut strings and period instruments while re-imagining the baroque in a program that spans five centuries.

     With virtuosity to burn and seamless expression to match, Alexi Kenney, Emi Ferguson, and Bridget Kibbey illuminate the tension between the human and the divine … and our quest for enduring love via works by Marais, Merula, Biber, Bach, Messaien, Saint-Saëns, and Sebastian Currier.

     The series runs through April and offers season tickets for $100; purchase by September 18 and save 10 percent.

     $25. Sunday evening, October 9, at 5 at the church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     In the New York premiere of Nico Muhly and Alice Goodman’s The Street, superstar harpist Parker Ramsay will be joined by soprano Hannah Spierman and speaker Monica Wyche for a profound, provocative exploration of Christ’s crucifixion from condemnation to interment.

     Hosted by the Death of Classical series.

     $85. Friday night, October 14, at 7 and 9 in the crypt of the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

Desiree Rios/The New York Times

     The 181st Street A train station will close five weekends between July 15 and October 24 so the MTA can replace rails, switches and signals. Uptown service will terminate at 168th Street.

     Straphangers can switch there to shuttle buses from 9:45 p.m. Friday through 5 a.m. Monday.

     Beginning Friday night, October 14, around 9:45. Also starting Friday for the weekend of October 22.

 

 

     Join the Q & T Community for their monthly open mic night, a celebration with storytelling, music, poetry, art, and everything in between. All are welcome.

     This is an explicitly LGBTQ+ space, which means that we expect people to respect each other’s various modes of expression, pronouns, and showing up.

     Hosted by Memphis Washington. Light refreshments and safer sex materials will be provided. 

     Free. Saturday evening, October 15, from 5 to 8 at Word Up Community Book Shop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street. Monthly on the third Saturday.

 

 

     Looking for an unforgettable ghost adventure for you and your friends? 

     This exclusive, paranormal investigation gives you insider access to Manhattan’s oldest surviving house.

     You will learn the background of paranormal investigations, including the legendary paranormal activity at Morris-Jumel Mansion, while enjoying after-dark access to ghost hunt in the period rooms of the Mansion, normally closed off to the public. Believers and skeptics alike will enjoy the evening, and will have the opportunity to possibly communicate with Morris-Jumel Mansion’s former residents using paranormal investigative equipment.

     $74.78. Saturday night, October 15, at a time to be announced later in the Mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Get off Netflix and back into a real theater.

     Movies at the Palace are back, screening the favorite films of 2,000 Uptowners who cast their ballots in the winter.

     This month’s film is Coco.

     Free. Sunday, October 16, around noon at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

     When the Mavericks come to town, they will flip on its head their usual approach of country & rock. This time they’re including salsa, ska, norteño, mariachi and more, with twangy guitars to boot.

     Up to $180.45. Friday night, October 21, at 8 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

     Looking for an unforgettable ghost adventure for you and your friends? 

     This exclusive, paranormal investigation gives you insider access to Manhattan’s oldest surviving house.

     You will learn the background of paranormal investigations, including the legendary paranormal activity at Morris-Jumel Mansion, while enjoying after-dark access to ghost hunt in the period rooms of the Mansion, normally closed off to the public. Believers and skeptics alike will enjoy the evening, and will have the opportunity to possibly communicate with Morris-Jumel Mansion’s former residents using paranormal investigative equipment.

     $74.78. Saturday night, October 22, at a time to be announced later in the Mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Pianist and filmmaker James Carson has spent nearly two decades developing a new form of music. A childhood prodigy born with perfect pitch, Carson abandoned a rapidly ascending career  to travel the world, and then to spend five years designing, building and practicing in a remote cabin in northern Canada.

     Drawing from his isolated time in that cabin, Carson now creates a wholly new music with each performance, by removing his own intentions and instead receiving and channeling all forces and energies that are present, both within and beyond the performance space, resulting in spiritual concert experiences.

     In this underground performance, Carson celebrates the release of his debut album The Story of Birds by exploring the transformative, transcendent space that is the Crypt.

     $85. Thursday night, October 27, at 7:30 and 9 in the Crypt of the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

     Mark the centennial of a classic frightful film with Nosferatu, one of the pinnacles of German Expressionist filmmaking. It famously ran afoul of Bram Stoker’s estate, which won a settlement against the producers for borrowing too freely from his novel, Dracula.

     Accompanying the slient classic will be a live performance on a theater organ in a loan  coordinated by the New York Theatre Organ Society.

     Come early for our Halloween shenanigans including a costume parade across the stage.

     Saturday evening, October 29, with the parade at about 5 and the screening at 5:56—sunset, for you vampires—at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

     Looking for an unforgettable ghost adventure for you and your friends? 

     This exclusive, paranormal investigation gives you insider access to Manhattan’s oldest surviving house.

     You will learn the background of paranormal investigations, including the legendary paranormal activity at Morris-Jumel Mansion, while enjoying after-dark access to ghost hunt in the period rooms of the Mansion, normally closed off to the public. Believers and skeptics alike will enjoy the evening, and will have the opportunity to possibly communicate with Morris-Jumel Mansion’s former residents using paranormal investigative equipment.

     $74.78. Saturday night, October 29, at a time to be announced later in the Mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Violinist Jennifer Koh has rewritten the boundaries of violin music over the course of her heralded career, performing classics in innovative and different ways, while also building a new repertoire through her endlessly inventive commissioning projects.

     Descend to the Crypt to hear Koh bring light to the darkest of spaces with her virtuosity vision. 

     $85. Thursday night, November 3, at 6:30 and 8 in the Crypt of the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     UP Theater presents an award-winning, one-woman show that depicts a young woman at the intersection of heartbreak, mental illness, identity, and, oh yeah, a pandemic.

     Created and performed by Ellie Brelis.

     Saturday, November 5, at a time and place to be announced later.

 

 

     What’s old is made new again if the members of Owls have anything to say about it.

     Each an artistic force in their own right, Alexi Kenney, Ayane Kozasa, Gabriel Cabezas and Paul Wiancko endeavor to give new meaning to the so-called traditional concert experience with their fierce interpretations of an endlessly eclectic repertoire. In other words, ideal for a Death of Classical performance.

     $85. Wednesday night, November 9, at 6:30 and 8 in the Crypt of the Church of the Intercession on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     Looking for an unforgettable ghost adventure for you and your friends? 

     This exclusive, paranormal investigation gives you insider access to Manhattan’s oldest surviving house.

     The Morris-Junel Mansion has historically hosted and been home to famous and unique veterans, from the French and Indian War through to today—and may still house some of those veterans, according to the Mansion’s paranormal lore.

     You will learn the background of paranormal investigations, including the legendary paranormal activity at the Mansion, while enjoying after-dark access to ghost hunt in the period rooms of the Mansion, normally closed off to the public. Believers and skeptics alike will enjoy the evening, and will have the opportunity to possibly communicate with Morris-Jumel Mansion’s former residents using paranormal investigative equipment.

     $74.78. Friday night, November 11, at a time to be announced later in the Mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, saxophonist Miguel Zenón is one of today’s leading jazz giants who also makes WaHi his home.

     A multiple Grammy nominee, MacArthur and Guggenheim Fellow, Miguel tours internationally as a bandleader, composer, and arranger, drawing inspiration from the Puerto Rican songbook to contemporary jazz voices.

     For his appearance in the Music at Our Saviour’s Atonement series, Zenón teams up with duo partner, the Venezuelan pianist Luis Perdromo, in an excavation of the Cuban bolero. The popular Latin American ballad has traversed and morphed across South America, and landed right in the heart of the city.

     Free. Sunday evening, November 20, at 5 at the church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     A yearly gathering on Thanksgiving will remind you of the Lenape people and the blessings of their land we now call home.

     A short ceremony honors our duty to Mother Earth and our responsibility to the forest, the river, and each other.

     Free. Thanksgiving morning at 9 at Shorakkopoch Rock in Inwood Hill Park. From the intersection of 214th Street and Indian Road, follow the path that runs along the water; the boulder is on the far side of a large, open field.

 

 

     The guitarist Jiji plays an extensive range of music, from traditional and contemporary classical to free improvisation, marrying old and new into something that is at once undefinable yet familiar.

     Her graceful, groundbreaking approach to the guitar will resonate deep within the intimate confines of the Crypt in the Death of Classical series.

     $85. Two performances on Monday night, November 28: 7:30 and 9, with each proceded by a wine and cheese reception an hour earlier. At the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     What do you get when you take two Juilliard-trained cellists and a vocalist who's topped the bills at some of New York's finest jazz establishments?

     You get Empire Wild, a trio comprised of Ken Kubota, Mitch Lyon, and Holly Bean, whose musical explorations transform pop, folk, Broadway and more into a musical gumbo that's equal parts talent, joy, and magic.

     Enjoy their performance in the conclusion of this season’s Death of Classical series.

     $85. Two performances on Wednesday night, November 30: 7:30 and 9, with each proceded by a wine and cheese reception an hour earlier. At the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

 

     You loved it on the radio (and podcast).

     Now come and experience Uptown’s holiday classic live and in person. UP Theater presents the Richard Diamond Christmas Show, featuring the hard-boiled detective who mixes noir and the holidays and still comes out alive.

     In December on a date and at a time and place to be announced later.

 

 

 

 

     The Belle Époque ushered French audiences into new harmonies and emotions, with the concert harp playing a soloist’s role for the first time in classical music’s history.

     With origins in Paris and the French masters of modernism, Birdget Kibbey showcases the harp’s most opulent masterworks alongside the Calidore String Quartet. The Calidores take listeners into the most nuanced journey of timbre and color in Claude Debussy’s Danses Sacrée et Profane. They will also perform André Caplet’s The Mask of the Red Death

     The concert is your chance to hear this talented ensemble before they head out on tour. The Calidores are Jeffrey Mays and Ryan Meehan on violin, Jeremy Berry on viola, and Estelle Choi on cello.

     Free. Sunday evening, December 11, at 5 at Our Saviour’s Church of the Atonement in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

Into winter

     It’s dark, it’s cold, and no one wants to leave a warm room.

     That means it’s time to bundle up for UP Theater’s Dead of Winter series. The troupe performs four staged readings, each with the wintry theme.

      Saturday nights in January at a time and place to be announced later.

 

      If you like outdoor geometry, get on the street for sunrise and sunset when the shadows line up with the streets.

      The “Manhattanhenge” effect works Uptown on days different from the rest of the island’s.

      To see the sun line up with the streets in Hudson Heights (on 181st Street in the photo), where the street grid is aligned differently from most of the borough, get out on April 18; it’s also on August 26 in Hudson Heights Henge. Fort George Henge is on the same dates as Manhattan, and Inwood Henge is on January 23 — the grid there is so katy-wompus that the sun aligns when it is due “south.”

     The effect works below 174th and above 174th if you go east of Broadway (for sunrise: sunset views may be blocked by buildings to the west). So if you want to see Manhattanhenge, as it’s dubbed, hope for clear skies on May 30 and June 12.

     Inwood Henge: Monday, January 23, at dawn and dusk.

     You can look for the dates in all the city’s neighborhoods on this map from Carto.

 

 

     Fans of the Music at Our Savior’s Atonement series may remember Yacouba Sissoko’s quick kora cameo performance last season. Hailing from fourteen generations of kora players chosen by the King of Mali, Yacouba touches hearts with his hands and voice, in songs examining concepts of finding a new home and belonging, while looking back and preserving.

     Percussionist John Hadfield has traversed the Middle East and the Maghreb, and further to Asia, soaking up the ways percussion plays a role in the countless musical traditions. Today, he is in demand with jazz and folk artists across the globe, weaving his experiences into powerful new works and improvisations for percussion that combine the heartfelt with a singular verve.

     With the harp, Bridget Kibbey, the series’ music director, brings her cultural-chameleon ethos to this virtuosic pair in surprising new works written by both —inspired by their travels—while celebrating their shared experiences in town.

     $25. Sunday evening, February 5, at 5 at the church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

 

     The mezzo-soprano Erin Wagner performs with pianist Shawn Chang.

     It’s part of a music series featuring Uptown artists.

     $25 donation. Saturday night, February 11, at 7 at Holy Trinity Church in Inwood on Cumming Street at Seaman Avenue.

 

 

 

 

     A candle-lit meditation will open hearts and minds before an hour of active listening … with one of J.S. Bach’s most well-known works leading the way.

     Three of today’s top chamber musicians illuminate a refrain of the contemplative aria that sets the stage for profound, exulting variations ever written.

     Featuring Siwoo Kim on violin, Melissa Reardon on viola, and Raman Ramakrishnan on cello.

     For this performance in the Music at Our Saviour’s Atonement series you can settle into a cozy environment, listen together, and sip local libations.

     $25. Sunday evening, March 5, at 5at the church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     The Music at Our Saviour’s Atonement season closes with three of today’s Gypsy All-Stars on the stage.

     Hailing from Macedonia, Turkey, and Armenia, the Secret Trio explores the music they grew up hearing in a fusion of grooves and soulful melodies that merge the blues with folklore – all adding up to wild virtuosity.

     Featuring Ara Dinkjian on the oud, Ismail Lumanovski on clarinet, Tamer Pinarbasi on qanun.

     $25. Sunday evening, April 16, at 5 at the church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     An older punk rocker looking back at the hard knocks and glory days of the band that propelled her to fame (sort of) reveals herself in UP Theater’s fourteenth mainstage production.    

     The Best Punk Band in Conway, Missouri: An Oral History of Pressley Cox and the Fallout Five combines story-telling techniques. By Kirby Fields.

     In May on dates and at times and a place to be announced later.

 

 

     Only in New York ...

     One day late in most springs, The Great and Glorious Grand Army of The Bronx comes together to claim the neighborhood of Marble Hill which, the group suggests, belongs to the only borough on the mainland on the basis that it was annexed by Bronx Borough President James Lyons in the 1930s.
     Care to fight back? Everyone is welcome, even hecklers.
     Free. A Saturday morning in May, with a meet-up typically in a bar. Check back in the spring so you can join the forces or prepare defenses.

 

 

     Join the cast, crew, and friends of UP Theater to celebrate their thirteenth birthday.

     The evening features food, drink, raffles and honoring the Upstanding Person of the Year.

     In May on a date and at a time and place to be announced later.

 

 

     The annual Drums Along the Hudson began in 2002 as a traditional Pow Wow to celebrate Native American heritage and culture, and also to commemorate the Lenape people who first inhabited Inwood Hill Park, or Shorakapok (“edge of the water”).

     The twentith anniversary event features dancers and drummers from around the world, combining Native American heritage, culture and art with the diversity of New York City. Activities include a Tree of Peace planting, international cuisine, Native American storytelling, a Pow Wow and crafts.
     The event has attracted a growing audience, numbering from 400 in the first year to over 8,000 in pre-Covid years.
     Free. A Sunday in early June
in Inwood Hill Park at Indian Road and 218th Street.

 

 

Contact Us Today

Board of Directors

447 Ft. Washington Owners’ Corp.
447 Ft. Washington Ave, Apt. 68
New York, NY 10033
(212) 896-8600
board@thepinehurst.org

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