Events in the Neighborhood, November 20–26

     Forty-seven families lost their homes in the fire on 144th Street last week. To make matters worse, they are now without basic necessities. If you can help, take your donation of clothing, school supplies, or toiletries to Councilman Mark Levine’s office at 500 West 141st Street, at Amsterdam Avenue.

Hudson Heights, Fort George and Lower WaHi

Monday

     Take a stroll that pro-actively burns a few calories before Thursday’s feast.  The High Bridge—New York City’s oldest standing bridge—is an iconic landmark that connects pedestrians and bicyclists from Manhattan and the Bronx.
     The High Bridge is a patch from the neighborhoods of Washington Heights to Highbridge in the Bronx, and is accessible from both boroughs.
     Free. Daily from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Enter from Highbridge Park, in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue in the 170s.

 

 

Tuesday

 

    The Yeshiva Macs play their second home basketball game against Sarah Lawrence College.

     Tuesday night at 8 in the Max Stern Gym on the Fort George campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday

Happy Thanksgiving! Best wishes for a safe and enjoyable holiday from The Pinehurst.

Saturday

     Clean out your closets and recycle at the same time.
     Bring clean and dry textiles like clothing, paired shoes, towels, sheets, scarves, hats, bags and belts for reuse or recycling. Sponsored by
Grow NYC.
     Free. Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Inwood Greenmarket (in Inwood Hill Park) on Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

 

 

     Discover the connections between Europe and the East during the middle ages during a special gallery talk at the Cloisters.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday at noon and 2 at the museum in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

 

 

     Take your digital camera or smartphone to capture the beauty of Inwood Hill Park during the golden hour before sunset on a hike that takes you to the best spots.

      Free. Saturday afternoon from 3 to 4:30; meet at the park entrance near Seaman Avenue and Isham Street.

 

 

 

     Poltergeists and spirits, beware.

     Learn the basics of ghost hunting while possibly communicating with some of the former residents of Manhattan’s oldest standing house. And yes, it’s said to be haunted. For more information please contact publicprograms@morrisjumel.org

     $30; members and students, $25. Saturday night at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Jumel Terrace. This event is sold out. Another investigation will take place December 16.

 

 

Sunday

     The United Palace House of Inspiration invites you to its interfaith service featuring Pamela Lewis, a recipient of the 2013 Broadwayworld.com New York Cabaret Award and nominee for a 2016 MAC Award.

     The speaker for that service will be Cicely Bland, who will talk about making gratitude a daily habit.

     Free. Sunday at noon at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     The power of art to make an emotional connection is on display every Sunday afternoon in Apartment 3F—that’s Marjorie Eliot’s place, where she invites veteran musicians to play along. 

     Famous and up-and-coming artists perform at Eliot’s weekly sessions and her free concerts are legendary among jazz aficionados.

     Free. Sunday afternoons at 4 at 555 Edgecombe Avenue, Apt. 3F, in Lower WaHi.

 

 

Continuing in the neighborhood

     Every Saturday (weather permitting), Northern Manhattan Parks Inwood Astronomy Project offers free star and planet gazing in Inwood Hill Park. These free, family-friendly events aim to spread the joys of the evening sky, and help you to learn more about the nature of our Solar System and current happenings in Astronomy.
     This week’s sky updates come from
StarDate.
     Saturday nights from 8 to 10 on the ball fields near Seaman Avenue and Isham Street in Inwood. A
map is here.

 

 

     A New York farmers’ market is open Thursdays on 175th Street between Wadsworth Avenue and  Broadway.

 

    The Inwood greenmarket is a year-round neighborhood favorite.
    People of all ages, backgrounds, and tastes gather each Saturday to meet and greet their friends and neighbors and do their weekly shopping. Even on the coldest, darkest winter Saturdays, loyal Inwood shoppers come out because they know they can’t get products like this anywhere else.
     A core group of 15 farmers attends every week of the year, and during the peak of the season, five more join to round out the offerings with the summer’s bounty.
     Saturdays from 8 to 3 on
Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

     From late spring through the late autumn, a greenmarket in Lower WaHi offers Mexican herbs, peppers, and greens, honey, cheese, juice pressed from ripe orchard fruit, produce grown in the rich soil of Orange County’s “Black Dirt” region, pastries and fresh bread. You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     Saturdays in the spring and summer on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street. On hiatus until spring.

 

 

     Crack a spine for the first meeting of the Hebrew Tabernacle Book Club, open to the community. Read local!
    Refreshments will be served. Send your questions and suggestions to Susan at susan_gellert@yahoo.com.

     Free. Hosted by the Hebrew Tabernacle of Washington Heights, in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue just above 185th Street.

 

 

 

Planning ahead

     Four women—two dancers and two violists—explore progress and regress, ascent and descent, addition and subtraction. The performance is part of Lobby Series, Creating Higher Ground.

     Dancers and choreographers: Mara Driscoll, Rebecca Walden; violists: Carrie Davids, Allyson Clare.

     Seating in the Grand Foyer is limited, so reserve your spot here.

     Free. Monday night, November 27, at 7 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     Test your knowledge of the American revolution, Washington Heights geography, and the history of the oldest house in Manhattan.

     Historic trivia night is a friendly competition in the Uptown house, right, where history was made during the Revolution.

     Teams of four to eight contestants are highly encouraged.

     $10 per entrant. Thursday night, November 30, at 7 at the Morris Jumel Mansion in Lower WaHi on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Warrior Queen Initiative hosts this monthly women’s open mic featuring all female and gender nonconforming performers. All audience members welcome to enjoy the poetry, music and perhaps some comedy. 

     Each performer gets 5 minutes to perform whatever she (or they) likes.

     Free. Thursday night, November 30, at 7 at the Word Up Community Bookshop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street.

 

 

     The Washington Heights Music Fest in collaboration with W.H.A.M. hosts a monthly open mic for artists, poets, singers, writers and performers. Refreshments will be provided.

     All ages are welcome, so the acts should be appropriate for everyone. 

     The first monthly musical open mic will be followed by session on the first Friday of the month. Hosted by Jason Rosario.

     $5. Friday night, December 1, from 6 to 9 at the Word Up Community Book Shop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street. On the first Friday of the month.

 

 

     You are the chorus in the 14th annual performace of Messiah at Hudson View Gardens. 

     Take your voice to join in singing this well-known masterpiece. You will be joined by professional soloists, a small orchestra, and conductor.  Non-singers cordially welcome.

     Scores will be provided, but if you have your own take it with you.

     Cash bar. Post-concert refreshments with the performers.

     $6. Friday night, December 1, at 7:30 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

     Join Inwood’s chamber orchestra for a winter celebration of the timeless works for violin and keyboard by J. S. Bach.

     Uptown residents and world-class performers Juliana Genghis Han and Wayne Lee present the complete cycle over two nights. The program will also feature the Bach-inspired 21st century piece “Sillage” (2007) by composer Ryan Francis, bridging past to present, and baroque Germany with modern-day New York.

     $10 to $25; children 18 and under, free. Friday and Saturday nights, December 1 and 2, at 7:30 at Holy Trinity Church in Inwood on Cumming Street between Broadway and Seaman Avenue.

 

 

    Join a group learning how to make fresh evergreen garland which will decorate the front of the Morris-Jumel Mansion for the holiday season. 

     You can also create two feet of garland to take home to adorn your own doorway. What’s more, hot cocoa will be served!

     This workshop is geared towards adults, but teens accompanied by parents are also welcome. 

     Space is limited for this workshop, so please register by calling (212) 923-8008 or emailing publicprograms@morrisjumel.org.

     $10. Saturday afternoon, December 2, from 2 to 4 at the mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Uptown is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Let the Urban Park Rangers guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle.

     Today’s birding program seeks out owls. It’s appropriate for all skill levels and beginners are welcome. Dress for the weather and take your binoculars.

     Registration is required at the Urban Park Rangers Program Registration page. Registration opens on Wednesday, November 22.

     Free. Saturday evening, December 2, from 5 to 6:30 in Inwood Hill Park; exact location will be shared with registered participants.

 

 

     Take a tour of Fort Tryon Park’s Heather Garden and the former Billings Estate entrance area and learn about Fort Tryon’s many conifers and evergreens with Leslie Day, author of A Field Guide to New York City.

     On this outing you will find out which conifers pre-date the park, and which have been added in recent park restoration projects to increase the variety of trees in Upper Manhattan.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, December 3, at 1. Meet in the Heather Garden, near the park entrance at Margaret Corbin Circle in Hudson Heights.

 

 

 

     The lively Baltimore Consort offers brightly arranged ballads, carols, and dance music from Renaissance Europe and their modern versions in the New World, all performed with a cornucopia of string, wind, and percussion instruments.

    $65. Sunday afternoon, December 3, at 1 and 3 in The Fuentidueña Chapel of The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park. Concert ticket includes museum admission.

 

 

     The Cornerstone Chorale’s autumn concert will share the music of William Byrd, Morten Lauridsen, and Randall Thompson. The voices are singers from the neighborhood.

     Sunday evening, December 3, at 5 at Holyrood Church in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at 179th Street.

 

 

     What is truth? Can it be found in our city? What do these questions mean when we continuously hear that we live in a “post-truth” age?

      Join the Gotham Philosophical Society to pursue the nature of truth in New York from a legal, artistic, and philosophical perspective, and then offer your own.
     Featuring Shahabuddeen Ally (The Lawyer), Jane LeCroy (The Poet), and Joseph S. Biehl (The Philosopher). 

     $15 suggested donation. Monday night, December 4, at 8 at Le Cheile restaurant in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Cabrini Boulevard.

 

 

 

     St. Joseph’s College of Long Island travels to the big city to take on the Maccabees this week.

     Tuesday night, December 5, at 8 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Find out where the loveliest sights and and most pungent scents are hiding in the Cloisters during a special gallery talk.

     Free with museum admission. Wednesday afternoon, December 6, at 2 at the museum in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     

     Joshua D. Zimmerman, associate professor of history at Yeshiva University, will discuss his use of a  variety of archival documents, testimonies, and memoirs to document an important problem in European history: the Polish underground from 1939 to 1945.

     Free. Wednesday night, December 6, at 6 in the Gottesman Library on the Fort George campus; enter from the 185th Street plaza.

 

 

 

     Take a step back in time, to when the Morris-Jumel Mansion was Talmage Hall’s Inn and colonial punch was all the rage.

     Learn about the history of Manhattan’s oldest house and its use as a tavern; once your palette is whetted you may indluge in a tasting of seasonal holiday beverages.

     Advance registration is required; 21 and older only. Purchase tickets here.

     $10 to $15. Thursday night, December 7, from 7 to 9 in the mansion in Lower WaHi on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Acclaimed in both the U.S. and Europe, the Lions Gate Trio combine performing, recording, and working with young musicians.
     Winners of the Koussevitsky Award for recording, the Trio features new American trios, duo and trio music of French composer Nicolas Bacri, the complete trios of Robert Schumann, and more. 
      For this special Uptown event, seating is limited and reservations are required. Contact eluest@aol.com.
     $12. Friday night, December 8, at 7:30 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.
 
 

     The Cornerstone Center offers open studios for its artists on one day before the holidays.

     Saturday, December 9, at a time to be announced later at Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

 

 

     Brooklyn Baroque, the musicians-in-residence at the Morris-Jumel mansion, presents its annual Holiday Concert.

     Philip Anderson, tenor; Jeremy Rhizor, violin; David Bakamjian, cello; Rebecca Pechefsky, harpsichord. 

     $30; members, students, seniors, $25. Saturday afternoon, December 9, at 3 at the mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     You’ve heard about it but you can’t quite imagine how this architectural confection came to be in WaHi.

     So here’s your chance to explore this stunning 3,400-seat theater, its mezzanine, grand foyer, balcony, exterior and if you’re lucky, you’ll get to go up on stage.
     Reservation is required
here.

     The history of United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth-largest theater and now a landmarked building, began in 1930, when it was then one of five Loew’s “Wonder Theatres” across the boroughs and New Jersey. Designed by noted architect Thomas Lamb (Cort Theatre, the former Ziegfeld Theatre) with interiors overseen by decorative specialist Harold Rambusch (Waldorf Astoria, Radio City Music Hall), it was one of the region’s premier vaudeville and movie houses.

     Free. Saturday morning, December 9, at 10 at the theater in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street. On the second Saturday of the month.

 

 

     The thirteen-member Waverly Consort, under the direction of Michael Jaffee, returns with this perennial favorite, a Met holiday tradition for over thirty-five years. Hymns, processionals, and other compositions from the Middle Ages weave together for a sonic telling of The Christmas Story in a pageant of exceptional beauty.

     $65. Saturday and Sunday afternoons, December 9 and 10, at 1 and 3 in The Fuentidueña Chapel of The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park. Concert ticket includes museum admission.

 

 

 

     Take a break from the busy season for a holiday concert with the pianist, composer, and conductor of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra, Chris Whittaker, and friends.

     They will walk you through an afternoon of new and inspired jazz takes on classic Christmas carols.

     Featuring Aubrey Johnson, vocals; Sam Weber, bass; and Jay Sawyer, drums.

     $30; students, seniors, and members, $25. Sunday evening, December 10, at 5:30 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Lower WaHi on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     Save the date: the Up Theater Company is planning its annual Holi-Daze musicale.

     Sunday, December 10, at a time to be announced later at Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

 

 

     Every month aspiring Uptown writers try out new works in front of freinds and neighbors. The theme for this gathering is  “Holiday Cheer/Fear. 

      Above the Bridge Writers Café is a playground for writers, a place to encourage and cultivate neighborhood writers and provide them with an audience for their work. Writers may submit five minutes of material of any genre or style (poetry, plays, fiction, non-fiction, blogs, etc.) that reflect the month’s theme. 

     Pieces are chosen by the Above the Bridge selection team. For details, contact abovethebridge@gmail.com.

     Free. Monday night, December 11, at Le Cheile in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at Cebrini Boulevard at a time announced to the participants.

 

 

     The Macs host two home games this week.

     First, Farmingdale State College vists on Tuesday night, December 12.

     Then the United States Merchant Marine Academy comes ashore on Thursday night, December 14.

     Both games at 8 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

     Brown Girls Read! is a bi-monthly reading circle for black and brown femme and women-identifie​d folk living Uptown. The group reads books written by authors of color and gathers to explore how the literature relates to their experiences as marginalized people.

     This month focuses on Urayoán Noel, is a Bronx poet, critic, performer, and translator originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico. He is the author of eight books, most recently the poetry collection Buzzing Hemisphere/Rumor Hemisférico.

      Free. Friday evening, December 15, at 5:30 at the Word Up Community Bookstop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street.

 

 

     For a frightful take on the holiday season, drop in for the second annual viewing of Tim Burton’s  classic, The Nightmare Before Christmas. From 1993, it’s rated PG.

     Seating is limited so reserve your seats by emailing publicprograms@morrisjumel.org. This event is filled to capacity.

     Free. Friday night, December 15, at 7 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park. 

 

     The Vox Vocal Ensemble, under the direction of George Steel, launches an exploration of unrecorded music from the Eton Choirbook, an extraordinary and gorgeous anthology of late 15th-century sacred music.

     This medieval Christmas story told through the eyes of Mary was written at the height of England's unique monumental style of polyphony.

     $65. Saturday afternoon, December 16, at 1 and 3 in The Fuentidueña Chapel of The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park. Concert ticket includes museum admission.

 

 

     The Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra's resident harpist and principal flutist perform a delightfully dreamy afternoon of French classics alongside imaginative arrangements of piano works by Debussy and Ravel.

     Saturday afternoon, December 16, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Poltergeists and spirits, beware.

     Learn the basics of ghost hunting while possibly communicating with some of the former residents of Manhattan’s oldest standing house. And yes, it’s said to be haunted. For more information please contact publicprograms@morrisjumel.org. The November investigation sold out, so don’t delay in making your plans.

    $30; members and students, $25. Saturday night, December 16, at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Jumel Terrace. 

 

 

     Lean the history of the Ring Shout as part of worship and healing and doing some shouting, too, at a time of praise and healing song.

     The Rev. Sandra Winter will be the facilitator. She is an Interfaith Minister, singer/songwriter, sound healing practitioner, and Certified Intuitive Angelic Miracle Healer.
     Sunday afternoon, December 17, at 2 on the seventh floor of the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.
 
 

     If your taste runs toward the Victorian, there’s not likely to be a better way to celebrate the holidays than in a beautifully appointed Victorian home, partaking of offerings of hot spiced wine, apple cider, and cookies while singing along to traditional Christmas carols.

     A special radio performance by the Fireside Mystery Theatre starts at 5.

     Victorian finery will be welcomed

     $10; members and students, $8. Sunday afternoon, December 17, from 3 to 7 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Lower WaHi on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Get a week’s head start on the night before Christmas with a reading of A Visit from Saint Nick, the poem with a first line that everyone knows.

     Its author, Clement Clarke Moore, was a New Yorker who is buried in Trinity Cemetery. The reading starts in the Churh of the Intercession, followed by a procession to the cemetery.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, December 17, at 4 at the church in Lower Wahi on Broadway and 155th Street, across the street from Audubon Terrace.

 

 

      Join neighbors and friends for an afternoon of readings, familiar carols, and anthems for the season, led by the  choir of Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church, and assisted by handbells, orchestra, and vocal and instrumental soloists. The featured piece will be Samuel Scheidt's Magnificat.

     Seasonal refreshments will follow.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, December 17, at 4:30 at the church in Hudson Heights at 175 Bennett Avenue.

 

 

     What better way to celebrate the holidays than with It’s a Wonderful Life.

     $10; students and seniors, $5, in advance. Sunday afternoon, December 17, at 5 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Take a walk down, beneath and through the Streets of Inwood to listen to the sound-sediments of yesterday and today.

     The composition will have its premier tonight, and is described as a musical reflection on the living layers of Inwood history that we live among and walk upon,  like the layers of raw earth, macadam, gravel, granite and asphalt that compose our streets.

      $10. Sunday night, December 17, at 7 at the Stack in Inwood at 4857 Broadway.

 

 

Winter and beyond

     The ensemble Sonnambula will perform music from “The Salon of Leonora Duarte,” a Portuguese Jewish Converso who lived in Antwerp (1610–78). At the end of the seventeenth century, Duarte published seven Sinfonias for viol consort — the only known seventeenth-century viol music written by a woman.

     The Hispanic Society Museum & Library sponsors the concert series of Hispanic Woman Composers, each paired with pre-concert lectures that highlight works by women composers with cultural roots in the Iberian peninsula and the Americas. Two more concerts take place next year, on March 8 and May 10, below.

     Thursday night, December 21, at a time and place to be announced soon.

 

 

    

     Ramapo College makes a trip to WaHi to visit the Macs.

     Thursday night, December 21, at 7:30 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Discover Jewish heroes in medieval Christian art when a curator guides you through the Cloisters’ collection.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday, December 23, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

 

     Are you on the Nice List? Or the other one?

     You’ll find out once Santa pays his visit. To track his progress the Air Force can help.

 

 

     Holiday shopping invariably means higher prices. What if you bought for your true love everything mentioned in a famous carol?

     The good news for traditional shoppers last year: the price of the gifts mentioned in The Twelve Days of Christmas increased only 0.7 percent, despite the surge in cost of turtle doves. (Really!)

     Prices for drummers and gold rings go up and down. Here’s where to find the prices for 2017.

 

 

 

     The Macs welcome Farleigh Dickson University for the last game of 2017.

     Wednesday night, December 27, at 8 in Fort George in the Max Stern Gym.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Stained glass in medieval churches was an example of how God sees the world, as explained by Cloisters curator Xavier Seubert.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday, December 30, at noon and 2 at the museum in Fort Tryon Park.

     Open Sprint night at The Armory lets adults compete on what’s called the world’s fastest indoor track.

     Hurdles, dashes, the mile, and a host of field events are open to everyone who wants to compete.

     $20 to compete in up to three events; some spikes are permitted.

     Seats go for $10; children $5. Saturday night, December 30, startin at 5 at the Armory in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

 

     Mark King’s Day with a special gallery talk describing the Three Kings in medieval art.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday, January 6, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Explore the northern Renaissance in a special gallery talk at the Cloisters.

     Free with museum admission. Sunday, January 7, at noon and 2 at the museum in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     We have word that Up Theater Company will return this season with its Dead of Winter series of staged readings.

     No word yet on the texts, but they troupe doesn’t shy away from challenging work.

     Sunday nights, January 7 through 28, at a time to be announced later at Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw place.

 

 

     Get out your spikes (but no longer than 1/4 inch) for the New York Road Runners’ Night at the Races.

     Events are open to anyone 18 years old and older. Tonight are the 1,000 meter, the 300 meter, and the 3,000 meter. $25 registration fee.

     Thursday night, January 11, at 7 at the Armory in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

    

     The New Balance Games are open to everyone who wants to give track & field a shot—or a run for the money.

     You can enter for $7.50 per event, with a limit of two events. Relays go for $25 per team.

     Watching costs more than running: $12; children $5. Friday and Saturday, January 19 and 20, at the Armory in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

 

     Continuing its family and friends exhibition series, the Morris-Jumel Mansion invites Felipe Galindo for a lecture.

     Born in Cuernavaca, Mexico, resides in New York. His work has been exhibited and published worldwide, from Mad and The New Yorker to Private Eye.

     His cartoon at left, “Barber Shop,” is from the exhibit, George Washington Revisits Washington Heights.

     Saturday afternoon, January 20, at 3 at the mansion on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

 

     Five promising young string players ages 13 to 18 will compete in the final round of the 2nd Annual Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra’s Young Artists’ Competition in partnership with Florian Leonhard Fine Violins.       Students will compete for the grand prize of a $1,000 scholarship, a solo engagement with the orchestra on our final concert with the use of a fine instrument courtesy of Florian Leonhard Fine Violins.  

     After a blind semi-final round the proceeding week, the finals are open to the public and will be moderated by a distinguished guest panel of judges.  

     Saturday evening, January 20, at 7:30 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     After nearly a month off, the Maccabees are back in action, hosting The College at Old Westbury.

      Tuesday night, January 23, at 8 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

     The New York Road Runners continue their open track events when Race Night features the 800-meter and 5,000-meter runs. The cost to compete is $25.

     Thursday night, January 25, at the Armory in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

     What better place to take in a film about ghouls the undead than in WaHi’s most famouse haunted house.

     A cauldron’s worth of fun awaits you with The Addams Family, from 1991. Rated PG-13.

     Seating is limited so reserve your seat by emailing Publicprograms@morrisjumel.org

     Free. Friday night, January 26, at 7 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park

 

 

     If you like outdoor geometry, get out in the streets for sunrise and sunset when the shadows line up with the streets.

      The “Manhattanhenge” effect works Uptown on days different from the rest of the island.

      To see the sun line up with the streets in Hudson Heights (on 181st Street in the photo), where the street grid is aligned differently from most of the borough, get out today: it’s on August 28 in Hudson Heights Henge (Fort George Henge is on the same dates as Manhattan, and Inwood Henge is on January 27 — the grid there is so katy-wompus that the sun aligns when it is due “south.”) In the spring, the date for Hudson Heights is April 18.

     The effect works below 174th and above 174th if you go east of Broadway (for sunrise: sunset views may be blocked by buildings to the west). So if you want to see Manhattanhenge, as it’s dubbed, hope for clear skies around May 29 and June 13.

     You can look for the dates in all the city’s neighborhoods on this map.

 

 

     The Four Hand Band presents music for piano four hands by Amy Beach, Fanny Mendelssohn, Mary Lou Williams, Carole King, and others celebrating the upcoming 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in America. 

     The evening includes a post-concert reception with a cash bar  when you can meet the performers and mingle with friends and neighbors.

     $12 donation (cash or check only). Sunday evening, January 28, at 5 in The Lounge at Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

 

     Cheer on the Macs when the host Mount Saint Mary College.

      Tuesday night, January 30, at 8 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     The Bears of Brooklyn’s St. Joseph College make the trip to Uptown for a visit with the Maccabees. (The Macs played Long Island’s St. Joseph College in December.)

     Thursday night, February 8, at 8 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

 

 

     Led by music director Chris Whittaker, the strings of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra come together to perform an afternoon filled with profoundly beautiful string music.

     The concert features work by Catalyst Quartet member Jessie Montgomery, Pullitzer Prize-winning composer and WaHi resident Aaron Jay Kernis, as well as music by Edward Elgar and Arnold Schoenberg.  

     Followed by a post-concert reception for Friends of the WHCO.

     Saturday afternoon, February 10, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Volleyball season opens Uptown when the Macs host their season opener at home against Brooklyn College.

     Sunday afternoon, February 11, at 1 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

     Mordecai Cohen, professor of Bible and associate dean of the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies, will discuss interpretations of the scriptures in Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, February 11, at 4 in the Gottesman Library on the Fort George campus; enter from the 185th Street plaza.

 

 

 

 

     Co-op owners whose apartments are their primary homes are eligible to receive a tax rebate, just as owners of real estate receive. Once you have applied for this annual benefit, called the STAR Rebate, you do not need to apply again, but you have to do it yourself—your co-op cannot do it for you.

     The application is due on February 15. More details are here.

 

 

     Cold out? “It has to warm up,” and Christina Ricci will help you do so.

     Grab your Cara Mia for the final indoor movie night on Jumel Terrace: Addams Family Values, from 1993. Rated PG–13.

     Seating is limited, so reserve your seats by  emailing publicprograms@morrisjumel.org.

     Free. Friday night,

 

 

 

     The Macs’ cagers close out their home season in a game against Purchase College.

     Saturday night, February 17, at 8:30 in Fort George in the Max Stern Athletic Center on the Yeshiva campus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Los Hermanos Rosario perform their merengue-inspired music, influence by their native Dominican Republic roots.
     $120. Saturday night, February 24, at 7 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

     Promoting filmmakers from Upper Manhattan, the Inwood Film Festival has recognized creative movies made in the neighborhood since 2015.

     Entries must be submitted by mid-winter, with the festival running over a weekend in Inwood in mid-March.

 

 

     The season’s Race Night, hosted by the New York Road Runners, draws to a close with its final events: the mile and the 10,000-meter relay. The coast is $25 to compete in the mile, $60 per relay team.

     Thursday night, March 1, at the Armory in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Music is the theme of the rechristened Washington Heights Salsa, Blues and Shamrocks 5K.
     The route is Fort Washington Avenue from Lower WaHi to the Cloisters and back, so prepare for a busy street. In 2015 more than 6,000 runners finished the 3.2-mile race. It’s one that qualifies for entry in the New York City Marathon, in November.
     Fee varies by age and classification. A Sunday morning, March 4, at 9 starting at J. Hood Wright Park in Lower WaHi.

 

 

     Music by composer Marianna Martínes (1744–1812) is the second in a series of concerts performed by Sonnambula and featuring women composers.

     Martínes was the daughter of Spanish immigrants to Vienna at the height of Viennese classicism. Recognized for her talents by the court poet Metastasio, a neighbor, Martínes was quickly enrolled in music lessons with Haydn. Once she had mastered the harpsichord she was the favorite four-hand keyboard partner of Mozart.

     The Hispanic Society Museum & Library sponsors the concert series of Hispanic Woman Composers, each paired with pre-concert lectures that highlight works by women composers with cultural roots in the Iberian peninsula and the Americas. Two more concerts take place next year, on March 8 and May 10, below.

     Thursday night, March 8, at a time and place to be announced later.

 

 

     Join the principal winds of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra for a blend of old and new, from French and American music. 
     The quintet will play works by Françaix, and Poulenc, as well as Brandon Rumsey, Kenji Bunch, Andre Previn and Robert Mucynzski.

     Saturday afternoon, March 17, at 3 at Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

 

     Yeshiva hosts the CSI Dolphins — that’s College of Staten Island — as the volleyball seasons winds to its close.

     Sunday afternoon, March 25, at 1 at the Max Stern Athletic Center in Fort George on the Yeshiva Campus.

 

 

 

 

 

     The Macs close out the regular season with a match against the Eagles of Bard College.

     Tuesday night, March 27, at 8 at the Max Stern Athletic Center in Fort George on the Yeshiva Campus.

 

 

 

 

     The three-acre Heather Garden is the site of an annual rite of spring: the Shearing of the Heather by members of the Northeast Heather Society and Heather Garden staff.

     Led by a bagpiper, a community parade through the garden delights children, who are invited to take an instrument with them (adults are, too). Throughout the morning you will learn why Fort Tryon Park has the largest heath and heather collection in the northeast, and how to propagate your own heathers with clippings from the shearing.

     Free. On a Saturday morning in April in the heather garden in Fort Tryon Park, near the entrance at Margaret Corbin Circle in Hudson Heights.

 

 

     The Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra’s concertmaster, Regi Papa, and principal cellist, Ben Capps, join pianist Konstantine Valianatos to form the Olympus Trio, performing works by Dvořák and Brahms.  

     Saturday afternoon, April 21, at 3 at Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Known as “superheroes of the new music world” (The Boston Globe), the JACK Quartet returns to the Neighborhood Concert series. With its “impeccable musicianship” and “take-no-prisoners sense of commitment” (The Washington Post), the ensemble has embarked on exploratory collaborations with such composers as Steve Reich and John Luther Adams.
     Presented by MOSA Concerts in collaboration with Carnegie Hall Neighborhood Concerts.
     Free. Sunday evening, April 29, at 5 at Our Saviour’s Atonement Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights at 175 Bennett Avenue.
 
 

     Only in New York ...
     One afternoon in most springs,
The Great and Glorious Grand Army of The Bronx comes together to claim the neighborhood of Marble Hill which, the group suggests, belongs to the only borough on the mainland on the basis that it was annexed by Bronx Borough President James Lyons in the 1930s.
     Care to fight back? Everyone is welcome, even hecklers.
     Free. A Saturday afternoon in May, typically, beginning with
pre-invasion cocktails; the battle of Marble Hill commences soon thereafter.

 

 

Cardinal Fernando Niño de Guevara, El Greco, c. 1600.
Right: Cristobal Balenciaga evening coat, fall 1954–55.

 

      Religious garments and the clothing they inspire will find a home in the Cloisters, among its art and architecture, for the Met’s exhibition, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination.

      A Balenciaga one-seam wedding dress will be displayed in the Fuentidueña Chapel, which is dominated by an enormous crucifix, with more couture in the others chapels and abbey. The exhibition continues at the Met’s Fifth Avenue location.

      Free with museum admission. Thursday, May 10, through October 8 at the museum in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     A choral concert highlights the life and accomplishments of the Venezuelan-born virtuoso pianist, composer, and singer, Teresa Carreño (1853–1917).

     As a virtuoso concert pianist, she was known as “The Valkyrie of the Piano,” yet as a composer and as an opera singer Carreño’s artistic life was vast, from childhood in her native Venezuela, to Paris and Boston, and ultimately New York. Last year marked the centennary of her passing, on the Upper West Side.

     The Hispanic Society Museum & Library sponsors the concert series of Hispanic Woman Composers, each paired with pre-concert lectures that highlight works by women composers with cultural roots in the Iberian peninsula and the Americas. Two more concerts take place next year, on March 8 and May 10, below.

     Thursday night, May 10, at the American Academy of Arts & Letters at a time to be announced later, on Audubon Terrace at 155th Street and Broadway.

 

 

     The season finale of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra features Jennifer Higdon's furiously virtousic opener, Machine, and a concerto by our Young Artist Competition winner.

     The season closes with Brahms' timeless and profound second symphony.       The concert is followed by a post-concert reception for Friends of WHCO.

     Saturday afternoon, May 19, at 3 at Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

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447 Ft. Washington Owners’ Corp.
447 Ft. Washington Ave, Apt. 68
New York, NY 10033
(212) 896-8600
board@thepinehurst.org

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