Events in the Neighborhood, November 11–17

Hudson Heights, Inwood and Lower WaHi

A collection of events and activities in the neighborhoods of Washington Heights, from Audubon Park to Inwood, including Lower WaHi, Fort George, Hudson Heights, and Sherman Creek.

     Looking for something to do with children? Click here or on the Kids’ Events box on the left!

 

Thursday

     When you join the Hispanic Society of America you will be invited to a reception hosted by the chairman, Philippe de Montebello, and other members of the Board in the Sorolla Gallery. One of the most stunning galleries in New York, it features the celebrated monmental paintings, Visions of Spain, by Valencian artist Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida.

     The galleries have been closed for almost two years as a massive renovation project modernizes the galleries. This is your chance to sneak a peak of the results before they open to the public next year.

     $35. Thursday evening at a time shared with members at the society’s home on Audubon Terrace.

 

 

     Ger ready for the world premiere of Angelfish, a romantic drama filmed in the Bronx.

     It takes place in 1993, when Brendan is a troubled high school drop-out with a manipulative mother. When he meets Eva, who’s about to start college, sparks fly and their  worlds collide.

     The screening will be followed by a Q&A with the stars and a party.

     Thursday night at 8:30 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

     

Friday

     When foreign spies mistake a Midtown ad executive for a government agent, Cary Grant goes on the run. The 1959 Hitchcock classic, North By Northwest, also stars Eve Marie Saint.

     Presented on a 50-foot screen

     $15; children under 12, students, and seniors, $8. Friday night at 7:30 with pre-show entertainment at 7. At the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     Vienna meets the Islands for arroz con schnitzle when the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra performs WaHi native Valerie Coleman’s “Afro-Cuban Concerto,” and then presents Mozart’s timeless Clarinet Quintet.

     Closing the program is Arnold Schoenberg’s revolutionary Chamber Symphony, which launched his expressionist style and sparked the creation of the second Viennese School of composers.

     After the Saturday performance you can join the the musicians for a reception featuring local food and a group salsa dance lesson.  

     $5 (at the door, $7); kids 17 and under free. Friday night at 8 at Our Savior’s Atonement Lutheran Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avene at 189th Street, and Saturday afternoon at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegian Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

Saturday

     Before Europeans came to North America, the Lenape lived in the area we now call home.

     The Urban Park Rangers will guide you to historic sites in Inwood Hill Park to discuss the culture of the Lenape people. You will learn about their daily customs and their knowledge of the forest, and sample food items that were the staples of a Lenape diet.

     Participants are selected by lottery. To register, please visit the Urban Park Rangers' registration page. Lottery registration opens on Wednesday, November 6.

     Free. Saturday at noon in Inwood Hill Park at a spot shared with lottery winners.

 

 

 

     Close out the Lions’ home football season (3-5, 2-3) against Brown (1-7, 0-5) and honor Columbia’s seniors.

     Saturday afternoon at 1 at Wein Stadium in the Baker Athletic Complex in Inwood on 218th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Join Yesenia Then Y Jennifer Pacheco for a night of worship at the United Palace of Spiritual Arts.

     $25–$100. Saturday night at 7 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Come take part in a real ghost hunt and learn the basics of ghost hunting with resident paranormal investigators Vincent Carbone and Christopher Davalos while possibly communicating with some of Uptown’s former residents.
     The evening begins with a discussion of paranormal theory and the history of Manhattan's oldest house. Visitors will learn how to use electronic paranormal detective equipment and then move into a full investigation.

     Participants must be at least 18 years old. Refreshments are included.

     $35 to $40. Saturday night at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Jumel Terrace. Also on November 23 and December 6.    

 

Sunday

     A yellow-throated warbler, a fish crow and boat-tailed grackle await your gaze on this two-hour tour of bird mural in John James Audubon’s old neighborhood, where he kept a country estate from 1842 to 1851..  

     Your guide will lead you to secret locations where contemporary artists interpreted and painted Audubon’s endangered birds throughout Northern Manhattan, above a subway station, wrapped around a bodega’s ice cooler and covering the walls of walkups and early twentieth-century apartment buildings. The tour lasts about two hours, so take some water.

     $30. Sunday morning at 10 at the Church of the Intercession across from Audubon Terrace on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     Transport yourself back in time and celebrate Uptown history as you mark the 243rd anniversary of the Battle of Fort Washington, a key event of the Revolutionary War.

     The Brigade of the American Revolution will perform and lead drills. Come to watch a blacksmith demonstration, listen to live 18th-century music, make arts and crafts, and play historic games.

     Tour the battle scene with a guide dressed as war heroine Margaret Corbin, who is in the picture above. Prizes will be offered for the most authentic costumes.

     Free. Sunday from noon to 3 on the Café Lawn in Fort Tryon Park; enter from Margaret Corbin Circle, naturally.

 

 

     There was a time when you could watch professional baseball in Manhattan, up here in the Heights.

      The Polo Grounds were home to the Yankees, who were called Highlanders at the time. You can find the location of home plate marked in a courtyard of Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, and you can join Neil Scherer of Going, Going, Gone Sports, on a one-hour special tour of the exhibition. Home Plate. Iconic moments from the Polo Grounds stadium are included.

     $15; Morris-Jumel members, $10. Sunday afternoon at 12:30 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Lower WaHi on Jumel Terrace. Also on December 15.

 

 

     The reading series Bloom presents a variety of authors and genres.

     This month you can hear stories from Safia Jana, Andres Cerpa, Sally Blumis-Dunn, and Peter Kispert.

     Bloom’s literary readings and discussions will get you to shake off your assumptions and think hard about everything. The evening includes wine and light fare. Pleasant as a tea party, but with booze and cutting-edge writing. More information at www.bloomreadings.org.

    $7 suggested donation includes wine and hors d’oeuvres. Sunday evening at 5 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens, in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street. Monthly, usually on the second or third Sunday, reliably September through May but not December.

 

 

Continuing in the neighborhood

     To celebrate the participation of the Hispanic Society of American in the exhibition “Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light” at the National Gallery in London and at the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin, the Society is reopening the Joaquín Sorolla Vision of Spain Gallery for a limited time.

     The gallery houses the monumental series of 14 paintings known as Vision of Spain by the Valencian master Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, the preeminent artist in Spain at the turn of the 20th century.

     Nearly 12 feet tall and 200 feet in combined length, the canvases that comprise Vision of Spain were painted by Sorolla at various locations in Spain between 1912 and 1919.

     Closed until 2020 for extensive renovations, these tours will be offered if you book a visit in advance at visitsorolla@hispanicsociety.org.

      Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:30 to 4:30, by appointment only, at the Society’s museum on Audubon Terrace.

 

 

     Clean out your closets and recycle at the same time.
     Take clean and dry textiles like clothing, paired shoes, towels, sheets, scarves, hats, bags and belts for reuse or recycling. Sponsored by
Grow NYC.
     Free. Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Inwood Greenmarket (in Inwood Hill Park) on Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

 

     In 1890, the third Polo Grounds rose within the gaze of Jumel Terrace and would serve as home to the New York Giants baseball team from 1891 to 1957, the New York Highlanders (who would become the Yankees) in 1913–22, the New York Giants in 1925–55.

     The exact spot of home place, seen at right in 1906, is now marked by a bronze plaque in a courtyard of the Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital. A lot has change since then, and history buffs and baseball fans will find the nuances and transformations in a new show.

     The exhibition explores the teams that made the stadium a New York icon and the associated personalities that became local and national heroes.

     Free. At the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park. Open through January 5.

 

 

    Slavery is a chilling chapter in the nation’s history, and it happened here in Uptown too.

     The artist Peter Hoffmeister explored the subject through investigations with curators, researchers and historians while spending a year as an artist in residence at a Manhattan farmhouse.

     His exhibition explores the themes and results of slavery in Upper Manhattan. Through March 31.

 

 

     The power of art to make an emotional connection is on display every Sunday afternoon in Apartment 3F—that’s Marjorie Eliot’s place, where she invites veteran musicians to play along. 

     Famous and up-and-coming artists perform at Eliot’s weekly sessions and her free concerts are legendary among jazz aficionados.

     Free. Sunday afternoons at 4 at 555 Edgecombe Avenue, Apt. 3F, in Lower WaHi.

 

 

     The High Bridge—New York City’s oldest standing bridge—is a landmark that connects walkers and cyclists with Manhattan and the Bronx.
     The High Bridge is a path from the neighborhoods of Washington Heights to Highbridge across the river, and is accessible from both boroughs.
     Free. Daily from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Enter from Highbridge Park, in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue in the 170s.

 

 

     Each month Uptown writers get together to workshop some prose based on the theme for the gathering.

     Join neighborhood authors who reflect on the theme’s meaning. Each writer will have five minutes to read to you.

     $5. Usually on the third Monday night, typically at 8, at Le Cheile in Hudson Heights just off Lafayette Plaza on 181st Street and Pinehurst Avenue.

 

 

 

     A New York farmers’ market is open Thursdays on 175th Street between Wadsworth Avenue and  Broadway.

 

    The Inwood greenmarket is a year-round neighborhood favorite.
    People of all ages, backgrounds, and tastes gather each Saturday to meet and greet their friends and neighbors and do their weekly shopping. Even on the coldest, darkest winter Saturdays, loyal Inwood shoppers come out because they know they can’t get products like this anywhere else.
     A core group of 15 farmers attends every week of the year, and during the peak of the season, five more join to round out the offerings with the summer’s bounty.
     Saturdays from 8 to 3 on
Isham Street between Seaman Avenue and Cooper Street.

 

     From late spring through the late autumn, a greenmarket in Lower WaHi offers Mexican herbs, peppers, and greens, honey, cheese, juice pressed from ripe orchard fruit, produce grown in the rich soil of Orange County’s “Black Dirt” region, pastries and fresh bread. You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     You can also take your food scraps for composting and used textiles for recycling.

     Saturdays in the spring and summer on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street. On hiatus until spring.

 

 

Planning ahead

     Join Met curators and conservators for conversations about the artistic achievements of Hans Greiff, his workshop, and 15th-century metalwork.

      Led by Barbara Drake Boehm and Janis  Mandrus.

      Space is limited. This two-session course is sold as one unit and individual dates cannot be purchased. 

     $175 (includes museum admission). Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, November 19 and 21, from 2 to 4 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     Matan Porat is a sonic storyteller, weaving disparate threads into a musical tapestry that takes listeners through time and space, journeying toward something greater.

     Amid the flickering candles of the Crypt, Porat will present his light-inspired program Lux, with twelve pieces, composed across twelve centuries, tracing the course of a day from dawn to dusk. Each piece possesses its own unique luminescence, beginning with a Gregorian chant for the break of day, ending with Beethoven’s immortal Moonlight sonata, and interspersing works that range from contemporary composers Thomas Adès and Matthias Pintscher to Bartók, Debussy, and Schumann.

         $80. Tuesday night, November 19, at 8 with a wine tasting at 7 in the Crypt under the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     Take in holiday decorations at Manhattan’s last remaining farmhouse.

     Cookies and cider will welcome you to the festive evening, with candlelight illuminating the historic home.

     Thursday evening, November 21, from 5:30 to 7 at the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.

 

 

 

     Women over 40 who haven’t had a mammogram in the past year and who have no signs of breast cancer are welcome to get a screening at the Mount Sinai Mobile Mammography Bus when it makes a stop Uptown. 

     Take identification to your appointment, health insurance card, and copies of past mammograms. The site is accessible by wheelchair.

     To register, call Paola Peña at (646) 369-3562 or send an email to pena@mountsinai.org.

     Friday, November 22, from 10 to 4 in Inwood at 5030 Broadway, between 213th & 214th Streets.

 

 

     Now that the Urban Park Rangers turn 40 years old, they are leading an “over the hill” hike in Manhattan’s only untouched forest.

     It’s not for beginners: the 90-minute trek features some of the steepest hills in city parks. Comfortable  walking shoes or hiking boots are recommended on this moderate to vigorous walkabout. Take water, a snack, and in case worse comes to worst, a geolocater (or your cellphone and a Metrocard).

     Free. Saturday morning, November 23, at 11, meeting at the intersection of Isham Street and Seaman Avenue.

 

 

     Composer and cellist Paul Brantley, pianist Arielle Levioff, and composer and pianist Rich Shemaria perform a program of music spanning from the 15th century to pieces composed last week.

     In addition to the music of “Anonymous, 14th Century,” Brantley, Buxtehude, Tina Davidson, Shemaria, and Joseph Zawinul, Brantley will perform the beloved Suite in D Minor for solo cello by J. S. Bach.  

     These world-class neighborhood musicians are performing in support of Our Saviour’s Atonement’s boiler replacement fund. The church’s is close to 100 years old, and it’s giving up.

     Saturday evening, November 23, at 7, at Our Saviour’s in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 179th Street.

 

 

     Come take part in a real ghost hunt and learn the basics of ghost hunting with resident paranormal investigators Vincent Carbone and Christopher Davalos while possibly communicating with some of Uptown’s former residents.
     The evening begins with a discussion of paranormal theory and the history of Manhattan's oldest house. Visitors will learn how to use electronic paranormal detective equipment and then move into a full investigation.

     Participants must be at least 18 years old. Refreshments are included.

     $35 to $40. Saturday night, November 23, at 8 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion on Jumel Terrace. Also on December 6.    

   

 

     Join the Urban Park Rangers for a walking tour starting at historic Highbridge, and ending at the Morris-Jumel Mansion.

     The two-hour tour is open to anyone but space is limited, and spaces are allocated in a lottery entry. Enter the by visiting nycgovparks.org/reg/rangers

     Free. Sunday morning, November 24, at 11 in Highbridge Park; the meet-up spot will be emailed to the lucky winners.

 

 

     The Chicago-based early music ensemble Schola Antiqua surveys the sound world of Emperor Maximilian I (1459–1519), one of the greatest artistic patrons of the Renaissance.

     The wide-ranging program offers luxuriant vocal music by composers in service to the emperor, as well as poignant works commemorating his death in 1519. Schola Antiqua also explores the breathtaking sound of extremely low voices, which played no small role in Maximilian I's musical experience.

     Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I.

     $65; children, $1 (that’s right). Sunday afternoon, November 24, at 1 and 3 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

     A special appearance by Jessica Thompson, the violist of the Deadalus Quartet, with Andrea Lam on piano features her favorite pieces.

     Sunday evening, November 24, at 5 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

 

 

     Fashions were changing in the medieval world. What were the latest styles?

     Find out in a special tour with Michael Norris, an art historian and lecturer.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday, November 30, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

     You’ve just enjoyed a table of culinary delights. Try a different kind of pleasure, with music fo flutes and strings.

     A Garden of Earthly Delights: Songs of Nature features Vivaldi’s Chamber concerto in D Major, Telemann’s Quartet in B minor, Couperin’s The Nightingale in Love, Bach’s Trio sonata in G Major, and more.

     The musicians are Laura Thompson and Sang Joon Park, flute; Dongmyung Ahn, violin; Myron Lutzke, violoncello; and Robert Wolinsky, harpsichord. A reception will follow the performance.

      $25 donation; students and seniors, $12. Saturday night, November 30, at 7 at Our Saviour’s Atonement Church in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

 

     The pentacostal singers Miel San Marcos are traveling to Uptown.

     $99. Saturday night, November 30, at 8 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

     A cache of jeweled rings, brooches, and coins—the precious possessions of a Jewish family of medieval Alsace—was hidden in the fourteenth century in the wall of a house in Colmar, France.

     Discovered in 1863 and on view at The Met Cloisters, the Colmar Treasure revives the memory of a once-thriving Jewish community that was scapegoated and put to death when the Plague struck the region with devastating ferocity in 1348–49.

     A generous loan of the Musée de Cluny, Paris, the Colmar Treasure is on display alongside select works from The Met Cloisters and little-known Judaica from collections in the United States and France.

     Jennifer Ball, associate professor of art history at Brooklyn College, will explain the idea of fashioning luxury on a guided tour of the exhibit. Presented with the exhibition The Colmar Treasure: A Medieval Jewish Legacy.

     Free with museum admission. Sunday, December 1, at noon at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park. Also on January 5. The exhibit runs through January 12.

 

 

     Vengan a ver una selección de películas documentales de las Américas, presentadas por la candidata de doctorado en NYU, Daniella Gitlin.

     En cada sesión, empezaremos con una breve introducción de lo que vamos a ver y después de ver la película, charlaremos un poco sobre lo que hemos visto.

     Join a series of documentary films from the Americas, curated by NYU doctoral candidate Daniella Gitlin. She will begin every session with a brief introduction, and after the film host a short discussion. The list of films is here.

     Free. Saturday evening, December 4, at 6 at the Word Up Community Book Shop in Lower WaHi on Amsterdam Avenue at 165th Street. On the first Wednesday of the month through June (except January).

 

 

     On December 4 Benjamin Britten will have been dead 43 years. Generally speaking, it’s tough to track people down after that long, but given the particular proclivity for all things posthumous at the Crypt, musicians managed to find a way with some help from violinist Mari Lee and her ensemble of musical gravediggers and spirit conjurors.

     On the anniversary of his death, these performers will summon the spirit of the composer via a program tracing his life through a series of musical movements mixed with read letters and reflections.

     At the heart of the narrative is Britten’s relationship with poet W.H. Auden, and their struggle to find an answer to a question that remains ever-more relevant in our present day: “How can we live in a broken world?”

     $80. Wednesday night. December 4, at 8 with a wine tasting at 7 in the Crypt under the Church of the Intercession in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 155th Street.

 

 

     Join a chorus of Christmas spirit during the sixteenth annual community sing-along of Messiah.

     Handel’s masterwork will be performed by a small orchestra with you as the singers — or you can just sit back and listen. If you have a score, take it, or you can borrow one at the event. Hosted by the Performing Arts Group.

     Friday night, December 6, at 7:30 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

 

     Emmanuel perform The Hits Tour here in Uptown.

     $45 and up. Friday night, December 6, at 8 at the United Palace Theatre in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

     Join the 12 member artists of Cornerstone Studios for a winter open studio.

     See work by Studio178’s first resident artist, Amanda Brown, and take home an original artwork for only $20 at the 20for2020 Postcard Fundraiser Show in Gallery178 (all proceeds to help replace the host institution’s boiler). 

     Later, join Brown for an artist’s talk at 5. Refreshments will be provided.

     Saturday, December 7, from noon to 5 at Our Saviour’s Church of the Atonement in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     You’ve heard about it but you can’t quite imagine how this architectural confection came to be in WaHi.

     So here’s your chance to explore this stunning 3,400-seat theater, its mezzanine, grand foyer, balcony, exterior and if you’re lucky, you’ll get to go up on stage.
     Reservation is required
here.

     The history of United Palace, Manhattan’s fourth-largest theater and now a landmarked building, began in 1930, when it was then one of five Loew’s “Wonder Theatres” across the boroughs and New Jersey. Designed by noted architect Thomas Lamb (Cort Theatre, the former Ziegfeld Theatre) with interiors overseen by decorative specialist Harold Rambusch (Waldorf Astoria, Radio City Music Hall), it was one of the region’s premier vaudeville and movie houses.

     Free. Sunday morning, December 8, at 10 at the theater in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street. On the second Sunday of the month.

 

 

     The Cornerstone Chorale presents shorter works from its 30 years performing choral music Uptown.

     The performance will feature music from American folk traditions, Latin American music, Jewish music, music inspired by nature, and other concerts.

     Composers include Victoria, Brahms, Fauré, Lauridsen, Paulus, Ticheli, and Vaughan Williams. More information is at (212) 928-7916.

     $20; seniors and students, $12. Sunday evening, December 8, at 5 at Holyrood Church in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at 179th Street.

 

 

 

     What are the religious meanings of the unicorn?

     Xavier Seubert will lead a tour and discussion of the connections between Advent and the unicorn tapestries.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday, December 14, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

 

     There was a time when you could watch professional baseball in Manhattan, up here in the Heights.

      The Polo Grounds were home to the Yankees, who were called Highlanders at the time. You can find the location of home plate marked in a courtyard of Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital, and you can join Neil Scherer of Going, Going, Gone Sports, on a one-hour special tour of the exhibition. Home Plate. Iconic moments from the Polo Grounds stadium are included.

     $15; Morris-Jumel members, $10. Sunday afternoon, December 15, at 12:30 at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Lower WaHi on Jumel Terrace.

 

 

     Celebrate Advent with the Gloria of Vivaldi and its readings, familiar carols, and anthems for the season. Led by the church choir and assisted by handbells, string orchestra, and vocal and instrumental soloists.

     Seasonal refreshments will follow.

     Free. Sunday afternoon, December 15, at 4:30 at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church of the Atonement in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     The Hispanic Society of America continues its concert series of baroque Spanish poets and composers on both sides of the Atlantic.

     Preceded by a half-hour lecture, the performances are devoted to the parallels and differences in baroque Spanish and American music. The series offers a richly textured overview of Spanish music and its projection into the New World, while highlighting a valuable part of New York City’s diverse cultural patrimony. 

     Thursday night, December 19, at a time to be announced later in the auditorium of the American Academy of Arts & Letters on Audubon Terrace at 156th Street and Broadway.

 

 

 

     Celebrate the season the new-fashioned way at the DJ Pereira Xmas Birthday Concert.

     Featuring El Alfa, Myke Towers, Lirico en la Casa, and Darell & Nio Garcia.

     $49 to $179. Saturday evening, December 21, starting at 6:30 at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

 

 

    Join Laura Thompson on flute and Sean Satin for a winter solstice performance.

     Saturday night, December 21, at 8:30 at Kismat Indian Restaurant in Hudson Heights on Fort Washington Avenue at 187th.

 

 

 

 

     Early winter begins a bare time of year, but in the Christmas season we bring hearty plants indoors to enjoy.

     Take part in a tour of holly, ivy, hawthorn, and rose, all plants of the medieval Christmas.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday, December 28, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

     The hurdles, dashes, pole vault and long jump are on the schedule for the New York Road Runners’ Night at the Races.

     Monday night, December 30, from 7 to 10 at the Armory Track in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

Into winter

  

     The tale of the Epiphany appears throughout medieval art.

     On this last day of Christmas, a special tour will show you where the wise men from the East were depicted in the Middle Ages.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday afternoon, January 4, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

 

 

     It’s a night of indoor competition when Historically Black Colleges and Universities compete in track and field.

     Friday night, January 10, from 7 to 11 at the Armory Track in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     In the nativity story, Mary and Baby Jesus are honored by kings and commoners.

     Find examples of depictions of Mary, such as the French sculpture here, Mary Enthroned, during a special tour of medieval art.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday afternoon, January 11 at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

     Celebrate Alexander Hamilton's birthday!

     You don’t need Broadway tickets for this party, marking a Founding Father’s 262nd birthday (or 264th—no one’s really certain).

     Families will get to participate in fun activities including cupcake decorating.

     Free with museum admission. Sunday, January 12, at noon at the Morris-Jumel Mansion in Roger Morris Park.

 

 

     Filmmakers from Marble Hill to Lower WaHi are invited to submit their entries in the Inwood Film Festival. This year the geographical area is expanding to include Riverdale and Knightsbridge, so expect plenty of competition.

     Categories include shorts under 5 minutes, shorts under 25 minutes, feature films and student films too.

     More information is here. The festival takes place March 12 through 14.

     Your deadline is Wednesday, January 15.

 

 

 

     Athletes in high school and younger are invited to compete in the New Balance Games.

     Awards will be given based on age.

     Friday night, January 17, from 5 to 10 and Saturday, January 18, from 8:30 to 8 at the Armory Track in Lower WaHi on Fort Washington Avenue at 168th Street.

 

 

     Take a journey to the knights’ world for an afternoon with Jeffrey Wasson, artist and armorer, who will demonstrate the process of getting into medieval armor with the aid of a squire by donning his own 15th-century style suit.

     Learn about the history of medieval armor; how it was made, how it was worn, and how it relates to The Met Cloisters' collection.

     The demonstration will be held in the Pontaut Chapter House.

     Free with museum admission. Saturday afternoon, January 18, at noon and 2 at the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park.

 

 

 

      Sam Suggs, on the double bass, performs Voyage Alone.

      Sunday evening, January 19, at 5 in The Lounge of Hudson View Gardens in Hudson Heights on Pinehurst Avenue at 183rd Street.

 

 

 

 

      If you like outdoor geometry, get on the street for sunrise and sunset when the shadows line up with the streets.

      The “Manhattanhenge” effect works Uptown on days different from the rest of the island’s.

      To see the sun line up with the streets in Hudson Heights (on 181st Street in the photo), where the street grid is aligned differently from most of the borough, get out on April 18; it’s also on August 26 in Hudson Heights Henge. Fort George Henge is on the same dates as Manhattan, and Inwood Henge is on January 23 — the grid there is so katy-wompus that the sun aligns when it is due “south”.

     The effect works below 174th and above 174th if you go east of Broadway (for sunrise: sunset views may be blocked by buildings to the west). So if you want to see Manhattanhenge, as it’s dubbed, hope for clear skies on May 30 and June 12.

     Inwood Henge: Thursday, January 23, at dawn and dusk.

     You can look for the dates in all the city’s neighborhoods on this map from Carto.

 

 

    Slavery is a chilling chapter in the nation’s history, and it happened here in Uptown too.

     The artist Peter Hoffmeister explored the subject through investigations with curators, researchers and historians while spending a year as an artist in residence at a Manhattan farmhouse.

     His exhibition explores the themes and results of slavery in Upper Manhattan. Through March 31.

     In this special event, Hoffmeister holds a conversation with the curator Gabriel de Guzman. Reserve your seat: development@dyckmanfarmhouse.org.

     Free. Saturday afternoon, January 25, at 3 at the Dyckman Family Farmhouse in Inwood on Broadway at 204th Street.

 

 

     It’s the summer of 1889, and Antonín Dvořák is on fire. He’s just about to begin composing what would become his eighth symphony, and he writes to his friend with unabashed confidence: “It’s going unexpectedly easily … the melodies simply pour out of me!”

     The February concert of the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra features melodically bold music from three centuries. Cerón’s “A la caída de la tarde” (At the End of the Afternoon) is a beautifully nostalgic and flowing soundscape from the Dominican classical tradition. Music Director Chris Whittaker presents a new violin concerto for the orchestra’s former concertmaster, Amos Fayette.

     The concert concludes with the sublime and melodious 8th Symphony of Dvořák.
     After the Saturday concert you can drop by a reception to sample local beers.

     $5 ($7 at the door); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, February 7, at 7 at the George Washington Educational Campus in Fort George at 549 Audubon Avenue, and Saturday afternoon, February 8, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     Co-op owners whose apartments are their primary homes are eligible to receive a tax rebate, just as owners of real estate receive. Once you have applied for this annual benefit, called the STAR Rebate, you do not need to apply again, but you have to do it yourself—your co-op cannot do it for you.

     The application is due on February 15. More details are here.

 

 

     She’s a legend.

     The rapper, songwriter, actress Lauryn Hill, performing Uptown. Best known for her part in the Fugees and her album The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, the East Orange native is touring again.

     $120 and up (way up!). Saturday night, February 22, at the United Palace in Lower WaHi on Broadway at 175th Street.

 

 

     The Fair Trade Trio specializes in creating accessible performances for all audiences and has a mission to champion the works of living female composers alongside the standard chamber music canon.

     The program begins with Jessica Meyer's I Only Speak of the Sun, which was inspired by Rumi's Ode by the same title while exploring the palette of colors the string trio can produce, followed by Schnittke's searing String Trio, and the deeply emotional yet restrained lyricism of Faure's first piano quartet.

     Free. Sunday evening, February 23, at 5 at Our Saviour’s Church of the Atonement in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     Music is the theme of the Washington Heights Salsa, Blues and Shamrocks 5K.
     The route is Fort Washington Avenue from Lower WaHi to the Cloisters and back, so prepare for a busy street. In 2015 more than 6,000 runners finished the 3.2-mile race. It’s one that qualifies for entry in the New York City Marathon, in November.
     Fee varies by age and classification. Usually the first Sunday morning in March, starting at J. Hood Wright Park in Lower WaHi.

 

 

     The fifth annual Inwood Film Festival is a neighborhood event intent on showcasing the sights, sounds, people, and talents of the filmmakers who reside in and around Upper Manhattan.

     The films take place in Uptown and the Bronx, so you’re going to see your home in any of the screenings.

     Thursday through Saturday, March 12 through 14, with locations and times to be announced later.

 

 

 

     The Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra presents a musical snapshot of a time and place, featuring classical composers living and writing in WaHi.

     You’ll hear Jessica Meyer’s lyrical meditation on quantum mechanics and Peter Gordon’s whimsical post-minimalism, Aaron J. Kernis’ poignant musical response to September 11, 2001, and Žibuoklė Martinaitytė’s dreamy impressionistic sonic landscapes.

     The performance brings together a collection of compelling voices a concert you’ll find only above 155th street.

     When the music ends you can pause at the post-concert reception featuring tastings from neighborhood restaurants.

    $5 (at the door, $7); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, March 20, at 8 at Our Savior’s Church of the Atonement in Hudson Heights on Bennett Avene at 189th Street, and Saturday afternoon, March 21, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegian Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     With stops in London, Cape Town, Sydney and WaHi, the Colour Conference is a global women’s gathering that places value on everyday women of all ages, backgrounds, and cultures.

     As a movement, the Colour Sisterhood has inspired women around the world to rise up, champion womanhood and partner in advocating for justice and social change.

     The Colour experience also has a strong humanitarian mandate toward the issues that women face around the world.

     $154.17 (early registration, through December 18). Friday and Saturday, April 3 and 4, at the United Palace Theatre in Lowe WaHi on Broadway at 165th Street.

 

 

     When you hear Bridget Kibbey, you’ll toss aside everything you thought you knew about harp music. Praised for her “bravura and sensitivity” by The Washington Post, her daring and diverse programming spans the Baroque era—her performance of Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is a YouTube sensation—to explorations of Brazilian dance music.

     Free. Sunday evening, April 26, at 5 at Our Saviour’s Church of the Atonement in Hudson Heigts on Fort Washington Avenue at 189th Street.

 

 

     Only in New York ...
     One day late in most springs,
The Great and Glorious Grand Army of The Bronx comes together to claim the neighborhood of Marble Hill which, the group suggests, belongs to the only borough on the mainland on the basis that it was annexed by Bronx Borough President James Lyons in the 1930s.
     Care to fight back? Everyone is welcome, even hecklers.
     Free. A Saturday in early May beginning with
pre-invasion cocktails; the battle of Marble Hill commences once the tab is settled.

 

 

     Closing out the season, the Washington Heights Chamber Orchestra presents a concert on the theme of destiny. 

     The program features Paul Brantley’s On the Pulse of Morning, Bienvenido Bustamante’s Concierto para Saxofón, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5.

     $5 ($7 at the door); kids 17 and under free. Friday night, May 15, at 7 at the George Washington Educational Campus in Fort George at 549 Audubon Avenue, and Saturday afternoon, May 16, at 3 at the Fort Washington Collegiate Church in Hudson Heights on 181st Street at Col. Robt. McGaw Place.

 

 

     After a hiatus of a couple of years, the Inwood Shakespeare Festival is plotting its return with Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard for its 19th season.
     Chekhov’s final comedic dramatic masterpiece is a bittersweet study of Russia’s elite as it adjusts to rapid social changes at the turn of the 20th century.
     Oh, and what about Shakespeare? Romeo & Juliet is one of the considerations. 
     The performances will debut in June. In the meantime, if you’d like to help support the festival, send a donation the Moose Hall Theatre Company, at
     25 Indian Road, Studio LA
     NYC 10034-1016
     Free. June in Inwood Hill Park.

 

 

     The annual Drums Along the Hudson began in 2002 as a traditional Pow Wow to celebrate Native American heritage and culture, and also to commemorate the Lenape people who first inhabited Inwood Hill Park, or Shorakapok (“edge of the water”).

     The event features dancers and drummers from around the world, combining Native American heritage, culture and art with the diversity of New York City. Activities include a Tree of Peace planting, international cuisine, Native American storytelling, a Pow Wow and crafts.
     The event has attracted a growing audience, numbering from 400 in the first year to over 8,000 in recent years.
     Free. A Sunday in June in Inwood Hill Park at Indian Road and 218th Street.

 

 

    The Medieval Festival is the most famous event in the Heights, drawing tens of thousands of visitors to the neighborhood.

     Lords, ladies, knights and commoners bring to life the customs and spirit of the middle ages, transforming a slice of Upper Manhattan into a medieval market town decorated with bright banners and processional flags. Visitors are greeted by period music, dance, magic, and minstrels, as well as jugglers and jesters. The day concludes with a joust among four knights on horseback.

     Free. A Sunday in late September from 11:30 to 6 in Fort Tryon Park.   

Contact Us Today

Board of Directors

447 Ft. Washington Owners’ Corp.
447 Ft. Washington Ave, Apt. 68
New York, NY 10033
(212) 896-8600
board@thepinehurst.org

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